Tilapia (Invasive in SE U.S.)
Tilapia (Invasive in SE U.S.)

BLEAK ALERT! Habitat, Habitat, Habitat!

“Unfortunately, I found that most of streams in Guizhou Province were
hopelessly polluted and devoid of life. And even though I consulted some of
my more proficient fishing buddies and the websites of several fly shops, I
have yet to find a fly that will hook the elusive Chinese mudsucker that
inhabits the ponds around here. The few times I have ventured out all I
have managed to catch are small, curious Chinese children.”

“I realized that if I were ever to catch any Chinese fish I would have to
give up my high-fallutin’ fly fishing ways and resort to Chinese methods.”

“When the Chinese fish, they really don’t like to give the fish a fair
chance. Each person has four or five rods and they chum the water with
bait. Not to mention that the ponds are really small and people line up
shoulder to shoulder around them. I’m sure to the fish, it must seem like
swimming around in a jungle of hooks and bait.”

“The Chinese would like to fish with automatic weapons, explosives, anthrax spores, and weapons of mass
destruction. Unfortunately, the expense and the fear of bodily harm keeps
them from doing this. Instead, they mostly fish with long, collapsible rods
with a bit of monofilament, a bobber, hook, and bait attached. None of this
reel silliness. The bait is usually pellets of what looks like guinea pig
food or a powder that is mixed with water to make a bread dough-like
substance.”    

http://www.bootsnall.com/articles/02-07/stumbling-through-guizhou-2-fishing-china.html

http://www.fishfarming.com/tilapia.html

http://massbay.mit.edu/seafood/tilapia.pdf