Slip Strike Bobber
Slip Strike Bobber
Slip Strike Bobber
Slip Strike Bobber

 Most fly fishers become aware of the value of a strike indicator of some sort, usually while nymphing on a stream or river. Although Czech Nymphing is popular, the dredging technique still is probably not as popular as fishing with a strike indicator. In addition to streams, an indicator is used by some on stillwaters for chironomid fishing. I have posted before about wind drifting a leech or pupa pattern beneath a strike indicator on a lake and noticed that shows with Chan and Rowley often show them using a sizable ‘bobber’ that is set up to slide down the leader when the fish is struck and the resistance is felt. The above photo’s (sorry for the second one) show the loop. Rowley suggests the peg and loop be on the bottom of the bobber to eliminate less tangles with the lob cast. The key to this set up, if I can explain it correctly, was to do this: on upper end of  bobber use finger to press off leader so it does not slide, take peg that has leader running up the middle of it, and is on bottom side of bobber and draw it out or downward an inch or so and form a loop of leader as you insert the peg into the bottom of the bobber. The strike will cause the peg to be pulled out, then the bobber will slide down to the fish’s snout, pissing it off and enhancing your enjoyment…oh relax and shut up PETA…    Don’t insert the peg so tightly that the strike/fish resistance can’t dislodge the peg.  The top picture gives a good view but Chan and Rowley and B.C. officianados recommend the peg on the bottom. I would for enjoyment sake pick a bobber that is visible, supports the flies you are most likely going to use and don’t go too big to reduce air resistance.