Archive for October 10th, 2010

10
Oct
10

Fly Tying: Tail Warp from Ribbing

I set out to tie a size 14 Little Black Stone, or to experiment with a contrasting abdomen (lighter colored wire ribbing against a black 8/0 thread body) as well as a dubbed, spiky thorax over a weighted under layer non-lead wire. I tied a couple and what I found interesting (yet again) was that I did not see that I had butchered the tail in both instances as I commenced wrapping the fine wire ribbing.

Little Black Stone, Size 14 (torqued tails) SwittersB

In the first instance, the first wrap of ribbing was brought from underneath and over the top/away. The wire ribbing divided the tail (hackle fibers) and split them asunder. In the bottom fly, I wrapped away over the top, and you can see the tail fibers were pulled off the top and to the far side of the shank. This, in particular, is a common problem. Usually, it happens as the tail is tied in. I thought I had tied it in on top, using the pinch method. Now, as I am prone to say, both patterns tumbling through the currents probably will fish just fine. But, the ever helpful macro lens reveals much in one’s tying techniques. What I take away from this is to pay much more attention to that first wrap of ribbing. Also, something that is also apparent is the thread body is not wound flat. The thread is no doubt twisted tight and does not lie flat when wrapped. The black thread abdomen was but three layers. You can see the bumps and ridges of the thread body. The wire ribbing often follows these contours and can spread or bunch following the irregular body contours. So, start slow and double check the steps. Also, unwrap and reapply if mistakes are noted. I cannot bring myself to spring for those funky magnifying goggles.

Read comment by Normand Frechette @ flytyingnewandold.blogspot.com/ Very help advise

10
Oct
10

Steelheading & the Loop

 

 

TM with Loop (SwittersB)

 

“The first thing is you need to carry a substantial loop, not just several useless inches as I see a lot of people fishing with. You want the loop to be at least the length of a fair-sized steelhead, say, 30 to 36 inches. Cut this in half and you get a loop hanging 15 to 18 inches below your reel. That length is usually sufficient, but I sometimes use more.” (excerpt from Dec Hogan’s book @ Midcurrent)

Present day: a must have book. Along with John Larison’s


10
Oct
10

Fly Tying: Bug Identification?

Last night, I ventured out to the rig for something and upon coming back toward the front door, I noticed the porch lights and white front door were covered with hundreds of these smallish flies. They looked like mid size midges, but they fluttered about quickly so I could not tell. As I walked inside, I considered how many I must have escorted inside. This morning, I noticed quite a few had made their way through the house to the kitchen sink and some water in a bowl, setting in the sink. So, I saw one nearby and snapped a photo. Don’t believe it is a midge. Any one know what variety of fly this is? Cranefly? Close as I could come with some research at Troutnut.

 

SwittersB

 




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