Archive for April, 2011

27
Apr
11

New Possibilities, New Promises….Seize the Moment

Morning of Possibilities (SwittersB)

Spring has sprung indeed. Despite some tumultuous weather in the midwest and South, finally there seems to be some opportunity to get out and wet a line. If you were a winter steelheader or salmon chaser, then you have been out all winter long, save the blow outs or frozen guides, and then maybe you were still out there. But, the trout/grayling fisher or pike fisherman have been limited by seasonal closures or frozen landscapes.

All the tying and fiddling with gear now culminates in season openers or ice off or time off. New possibilities. New seasons. The doldrums and/stir crazy days of winter are behind. Time to enjoy life a little more now. 

26
Apr
11

Fly Fishing: Spring Cleaning & Reorg

Headed Out Early (SwittersB)

A reminder for the multi-directional (species targeted) fly fisher: sort out your gear that has spread far and wide (albeit in the same rig in different gear bags). Bring it together for stillwaters, rivers, ponds.

Spring has sprung. The flies tend to stay divided amongst the species. But, pay attention to spools of tippets for rebuilding leaders, tippets and the tools (nippers, pliers, etc.) Clothing can get spread out. Have you laid eyes on those booties and fins since last October? The anchor you were going to fix? Do it now. My pontoon boat has a leak. I have been thinking about it all Winter, but have put it off, not wanting to do it in the cold.

My Winter Steelhead gear is consolidated (not used near enough). The smaller Steelhead flies, set aside for the bigger flies of Winter, are in the those boxes…where now? In one of those gear bags.

Just a reminder…..  If you fish various species of fish, then your gear gets subdivided and scattered. Spring is a nice time to consolidate the gear and see where you placed things while traveling, dumping gear in a hurry, and forgetting to go back to dry it out (oops!).

24
Apr
11

Fly Tying: Color Burst w/ Jean Paul Dessaigne

Jean Paul’s Inspiring Tying and Colors to Lift Your Spirits

24
Apr
11

Fly Tying: Reverse Hackling (Tenkara’s Sakasa-Kebari)

REVERSE HACKLING CONCEPT~TENKARA’S SAKASA-KEBARI

The ever creative Anthony Naples at Casting Around has had an infatuation the Tenkara fishing concept. One of the techniques in tying Tenkara flies is the wrapping the hackle wing so that it slopes forward over the eye (sakasa-kebari). In this piece, Anthony has combined the reverse hackle with that daunting tiny fly (let’s see how many flies we can put on a penny/dime?) style. This is an interesting concept for tiny flies in the film. Study the ideas and note that Anthony highligted another tier that has also combined the reverse hackling and small hooks. Also, explore Anthony’s site for beautiful fly fishing related art work.

Sakasa Kebari (Reverse Hackling) Anthony Naples

 

23
Apr
11

Happy Easter Weekend from SwittersB

I was going to do the sign from a Baptist Church for Sexual Abstinence that read: Easter Comes Once a Year, How Often Do You? I didn’t even look for the hot babe Easter theme…just inappropriate. So, in keeping with our love of pups and bunnies, I chose this pic from The Sodblog


 

23
Apr
11

Fly Tying: Underlying flash ribbing (Cz. Nymph)

Czech Mate Caddis Nymph (Orvis)

Czech Nymph

The above two Czech Nymphs are pretty much identical except for one small ribbing/flash detail you may want to incorporate….note the sub ribbing on the top pattern. It is often seen on many or the original Czech Nymphs. It is one of two ribbings, one flashier and one that goes over the top to tie down the back strap. The second rib, you will see is wrapped up between the underlying rib. Also, note with the top pattern there is an added factor, a tungsten bead, up in the thorax area, tucked amongst the dubbing. Two ways to tie much the same pattern, both fish catchers. Remember presentation of the fly is as important as the fly pattern. 

23
Apr
11

Fly Fishing’s Wisdom at Water’s Edge

Now, I am saying the following knowing there are exceptions, but in my life time not many that I can recall: almost every true learning experience for fly fishing came standing beside a man older than me. I have watched younger anglers and studied their ways, but to actually stand at the water’s edge and receive advice, suggestions, see into a fly box at a suggested pattern….that has, for me, for the most part come from men older than me.

Just an observation from my life. So, if you are an older beginning fly fisher, you are going to have to work harder (humor intended) to find that elder fly fisher. Now, as it were, the other day I encountered such a fine gentleman. I was exploring the access points to suitable fly waters around Eugene/Springfield, Oregon. Killing time, wasting time probably, while on a business trip. As I attempted to look at the river and not run over a jogger, I saw a silhouette out in the river. I thought pull over and go watch. I couldn’t fish at that moment, but at least I could spend/waste a few minutes watching someone else. I parked by the only rig in the area (his) and donned my coat. It was still brisk out. I walked a trail until I came in line with him, then made my way down to the river. Now, what did I learn by eyes and ears:

The man was fishing a spey rod, running line and a smaller head. He effortlessly cast out against a rock outcropping that plopped the smaller, darker fly into a quiet slot, which then took it swinging downstream into a seam and the nicest, chattering riffle. He let the fly hang after the swing and twitched the rod tip. Then he would strip in the running line, gather the loops into his bottom, steering hand on the butt and start over.

He was using a wading staff that he managed to use and then secure out of his way. He was fishing some 40′ out from shore, and the current was hitting him right above the knees. The pressure of the water against the back of his legs suggested the current was faster than it appeared and he moved with caution while using the wading staff.

He soon reeled in and tethered the dark fly and put a neoprene reel cover over his Sarcione (spendy) reel.  Once the reel was protected he turned the rod around with the tip to the rear, secured his wading staff and started a slow wade toward me.

As he arrived to land, I could see he had all the accoutrements of a more seasoned fly angler that been used and broken in. We exchanged all the pleasantries and he chuckled as he maybe felt obligated to answer what I had thought, but really didn’t know the current status: he explained why he was out steelheading alone  in April for Summer fish. He explained what site he went to in order to check numbers of fish over the falls below; he told me how many had come over and statistically how many fish he thought likely had made their probable way to the area. Then he again chuckled that he was trying to find just one of those maybe one hundred fish. Just a low probability gamble on a low probability pursuit.

He was happy, bubbling, vital. Just into his 70’s he had that energy. Probably why he proudly had that SB decal on his rig. So, now we talked and it was an easy going conversation. He talked about the oversized turbo disc on his smaller dark fly for agitation/animation; he talked about his travels (impressive bona fides), he remarked about the river being about a foot to high, hence the slower wading; and how it taxed him (would probably me too then). And, the explained contours, and buckets and tubs and ledges and skating flies with riffling hitches. He did all this in the softest voice. No brashness. No arrogance. He had no clue what I knew or didn’t know, but out of all this observation and hearing I learned several knew things for this spot and the area. It was an easy going encounter of the perfect order. 

This is the type of encounters I have had over the years. I can picture the old gents on the Wilson, Trask, Deschutes, Crooked, Minam, East, Tunkwa….I met and who shared their subtlest of tips that changed my success and enjoyment of the sport.

As I made my way back to my rig, I felt lucky to have met that man. I hope I have that vitality and twinkle when I am his age in the not too distant future. And, I hope I continue to share with reckless abondon (no, no I won’t give up the spot…that’s just understood).  

Grog’s Knots     Turle Knot      Riffling Hitch     Sarcione Reels (Oregon Made)




Below @ “The Past” you can search back to 2008 month by month

April 2011
M T W T F S S
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  

Please visit MUNCY DESIGNS (click)

Welcome to SwittersB & Exploring. Please Share, Comment & Like Away!

Please subscribe just below. Use the Search box to search topics.

Enter your email address to subscribe to the SwittersB blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 4,139 other followers

The Past

231!!! Countries Visiting SwittersB~Thank You!!!

free counters

Blog Stats: There are lies, damn lies and statistics

  • 4,791,198 Visits/Views (WP Original Stat~Pre Flag Counter Stats)

There’s No Accounting For Taste; Search the Blog for Much More. Thanks for Visiting!


%d bloggers like this: