Archive for June, 2011

30
Jun
11

Camera Battery Charger (Car/Cabin/Room)

More than once, my battery for my Pentax Optio W60 has died on a trip. Yesterday, with a dead battery and the original charger ‘borrowed’, I went looking for a replacement at a camera store. I found a charger unit for different Lithium batteries that not only plugs into the wall, but also the port in my truck. As I drove around on business, my battery recharged in no time. This will be nice in the field as well.

28
Jun
11

Fly Tying: Owl Feathers Perhaps? Nope….

Owl Feathers? (Oregon Live)

“An owl decided to make his home directly above the water supply in Weston, Oregon. It wasn’t long before the entire supply was tainted with his poop.

Public works employees detected E. coli bacteria when testing the water. They discovered the owl’s nest perched above the large tank of water, which goes to the town’s homes and is used as drinking water. Residents were told to boil their water or stick to bottled water.

Officials used chlorine to kill the bacteria, but what’s to stop other owls from defecating in the water?” (Oregon Live)       Native American Owl Lore   “I want to remind readers to use caution concerning the use of Owl feathers, since all Owls, Eagles and Hawks, including their feathers and body parts, are protected in the U.S. by the Preditory Bird Act of 1964.”

27
Jun
11

Fly Tying & Fishing: Hooks

For the beginner there is a confusing array of hooks to tie flies with. Here is a Nice Hook Tutorial at Bish & FishLike most fly tiers, you will determine your own hooks that are satisfying to tie with. But, the ‘code’ on the box or bag is important to note. Bish provides some clarification for the beginning tier and offers some thoughts on that small, bothersome notch…the barb.

26
Jun
11

Fly Fishing: Stillwater Random Thoughts

Green Butt Carey Special SwittersB

~When fishing a lake with an algae bloom, reduce or eliminate the number of knots in the over all leader. They collect scum. A one piece tapered leader or a uniform length of leader are suitable for descending down through the bloom to the feeding trout, just beneath.

~Indications of OCD: spending hours on a calm, still, smooth surfaced lake; sun high; hot, very hot. I have spent countless hours fishing such waters, picking up a small trout here and there. Short of doing recon on the contours, weed growth, identifying the drops, shelves and stumps there is little benefit to spending hour after hour out there. There are other activities back at camp and in the area that may better occupy that dead time on the water. 

~Are the fish refusing my fly? I have changed flies 6 times this past hour. Could it be the presentation/line selection and retrieve are not balanced to the flies or to the location you are fishing? As enjoyable as it is to use, the floating line cannot be your primary line on a lake if you intend to fish the depths. Research clear intermediates and faster sink rate lines for presentations beyond the shallows. Once the fish move off the shallows (sun rising, water calming, hatch ending) the waters just past the drop off should be explored with sinking lines.

~Presentation…the retrieves: it is nice to bob about out on a lake, kicking, rowing or drifting along in a day dreaming daze. Lost in thought and picking up the occasional fish. Again, considering the pattern you are using, what are you imitating and how is your presentation copying the real life movements of that food source: bait fish, leech, vertically ascending Chironomid pupa, emerging Callibaetis, diving egg laying Caddis, swimming Damsel headed for the reeds? If you are satisfied to kick along the edges of the drop then at least vary your retrieves to provoke a take.

25
Jun
11

Fly Fishing: Changing Flies…..When? Why?

Frequently changing flies is the sign of what? Impatience? A thought out progression of presenting  patterns? Giving up on ‘the’ recommended pattern(s) for that stretch of water? You paid $1.75 + for that little gem, why didn’t it work?

On  lakes, I change often. That rod is under my left arm/elbow every 10 minutes or so. As I search with trusted searching patterns, if  they don’t soon produce, snip, new pattern. I seem to have more faith in searching patterns that fit the standard stillwater food groups. I have an arsenal and I quickly change through it to find the connection. I feel more intuitive on a lake. Some would say it is easier; just find the cruising fish. I think it is presentation, manipulation through the horizontal/vertical pathways.

On rivers, I am more exacting. I study more. I plan upon what insects are in a certain drainage and which stages of the insect’s life are worth tying and presenting. If an insect emerges from the nymphal exo-skeleton well below the surface then in the surface film emerger/stillborn patterns are a waste of tying time. Better to tie wet, soft hackle, flymph patterns that replicate the emerging mayfly well below the surface, but swimming toward the top.

Stream habitat is more complicated than stillwater habitat re trout and their food sources (in my mind). There are often more options on the stream. If the clinger nymph rarely dislodges from the substrate and ‘drifts’, then stocky little nymphs are less useful. I study bottom to top. And, for some fly fishers it is the other way around: Rivers are an open book and lakes are featureless and boring.

SwittersB's Trout Chasing Nymph Tat

Research, then think before just tying on the ubiquitous Hare’s Ear Nymph or Adams Dry Fly and wasting a hundred casts, as the river pulses with life everywhere except on the end of your line.  And, again: location, the pattern, then the perfect manipulation/presentation. Random searching patterns are ok, for awhile. But, as you come up empty outing after outing, you will soon decide to learn more (insects, other fish food) about the specific waters you fish. Or, you might develop your own data through in the field observations. Check out a perfect example of this at Winona Fly Factory

23
Jun
11

Fly Fishing: The Water Is Alive

For the beginning fly fisher recognizing your insects can be confusing. On a lake, the insect population is seemingly distinct and more recognizable: hexagenia, callibaetis, dragons, damsels, and of course, the other creatures of scuds (rivers too), leeches, water boatman, chironomids (rivers too) etc. Maybe, at first you might confuse a damsel and dragon. On a river or stream, the puzzle can be a bit more confusing. 

The other night, an associate was fishing the McKenzie River. There were what appeared to be bright yellow, large mayflies out over the water, “as big as a dragon fly”. There were additional yellow mayflies near shore bobbing up and down and almost like a swarm. The fly fisher saw no surface activity from fish.

This is confusing for a beginner and also for the non-beginner. But, this is truly part of the fun of fly fishing! This part of the thinking, observing, planning, deciphering, responding that makes the endeavor so satisfying….at least if you successfully sort out the puzzle. If you don’t observe to start with or if you observe but can’t sort it out then it is daunting. But, don’t let it be.

Keep it exciting and do the research, which has never been easier for the beginner given today’s on line resources: identify the river (or lake) you were fishing. You can do this before or after your fishing. What hatch charts can you find for that water? What insects are present during what months or when you were fishing? Research those insects. Find pictures of the nymphs, duns, spinners for that mayfly lets say (or caddis?).

In my friends case: what were those ‘large’ yellow mayflies? PMD, PED, Yellow Sallys (stonefly), Epeorus, Golden Stones. Color, size, hatch location, stage of life (dun, spinner), hatch method, time of day…can be important in narrowing down the insects you are seeing. Asking the local shop; writing knowledgeable fly fishers who really know that water shed and insects. The resources are there. Then be armed with patterns for several insects from the bottom (nymphs) up to the top. Remember there can frequently be more than one mayfly hatching at the same time and the duns and spinners can be simultaneously present. Recognize the busy egg laying spinners (no fish activity); the hatching duns, different mayflies from spinners (in this case there could have been the hatching Epeorus, hatching Pale Morning Duns, and egg laying PMD spinners.

In this instance, I did a little research and learned something interesting. The larger, yellow mayfly called Yellow Quills or Epeorus is a mayfly that ‘hatches’/’emerges’ beneath the surface and then moves to the surface to view. Now I know that I should have, for that particular mayfly on that river a larger yellow wet fly to be fished beneath the surface. I learned from my friends bewilderment and hopefully you will too.

So, stay patient. Study. Ask questions. Observe and keep notes. Take a picture if possible. And enjoy the puzzle! Then again, I did some more research and in Arlen Thomason’s excellent Bug Water, he and Rick Hafele arrived at Heptagenia solitaria…a PED. All part of the puzzle.

21
Jun
11

Bushcraft: Organizing Gear to Link Together

Most of us park near the water we intend to fish and don our gear, hike in, fish and walk back out. No fuss. No concern. I have previously written about letting someone know where you intend to fish or trying (if cell coverage allows) to let someone know when you have moved. Proper clothing, water, a whistle, fully charged phone are all a good idea. More challenging hikes up stream drainages or cross country to find that lake you saw on Google Maps require more planning. I came upon this piece @ Stumbleupon that provides some organizing suggestions for your review and possible adoption. Leave room for the fly box and rod/reel case (4 pc.)

Bushcraft Hiking Gear

STUMBLEUPON ARTICLE RE BUSHCRAFT ORGANIZING AND ITEMS LINKING IN USAGE

 




Below @ “The Past” you can search back to 2008 month by month

June 2011
M T W T F S S
« May   Jul »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Please visit MUNCY DESIGNS (click)

Welcome to SwittersB & Exploring. Please Share, Comment & Like Away!

Please subscribe just below. Use the Search box to search topics.

Enter your email address to subscribe to the SwittersB blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 4,071 other followers

The Past

231!!! Countries Visiting SwittersB~Thank You!!!

free counters

Blog Stats: There are lies, damn lies and statistics

  • 4,749,962 Visits/Views (WP Original Stat~Pre Flag Counter Stats)

%d bloggers like this: