Archive for September, 2011

30
Sep
11

Fly Fishing: Remember Floating Nymphs

For surface presentations, floating nymph patterns seem to fall below the fly fisher’s radar compared to the standard dry fly or the emerger patterns. When we tie and fish nymphs we often weight them and fish them deep along the bottom where we are told the majority of fish feed. The deep presentation is true. But, when we see the surface activity, we enjoy the ease of casting a floating line and observing the take at or near the surface.

An unweighted mayfly nymph may be just the right choice for fish feeding at the surface ~SwittersB~

 An unweighted nymph can be an interesting fly choice in the surface film. When fish are bulging or slashing  just below the surface, the dry fly may not be the answer just yet. Lately, this is when anglers have been presenting emerger patterns, the dry fly pattern with a trailing nymphal shuck. A good choice for sure. But, keep in mind using a nymph pattern that is of the same color as the adult mayfly you believe is coming off.

There are nymph patterns (floating nymphs) that incorporate visible material at the thorax area of the pattern that give the fly a degree of floatation and a point of reference near the surface.

Explore the option of an unweighted mayfly nymph pattern at the surface.

 

26
Sep
11

Fly Tying: Suggestive Dubbing

Is this a perfect pattern for a beginning fly tier? A dubbed green abdomen and the teased out darker thorax on this little gem makes for a productive emerger/pupa pattern. FlyMagazinecComBr   Dubbing for the Beginner

26
Sep
11

New Fly Fisher: Take Fly Tying Classes

As Fall nears this is a great time to contact your local fly fishing shop or community college and check out the availability of fly tying classes. It is a never ending  journey when learning fly fishing. Adding fly tying and fishing with your own creations elevates the enjoyment of solving puzzles of fly fishing. ‘The moment’ when you hook and play a fish on one of your creations will put a big smile on your face.

 

25
Sep
11

Bigfoot, Sasquatch, Montauk, UFO’s…….

It is the weekend, most of you are out fishing. We are on a train headed for Seattle. So, I thought I would provide a few details about at NW favorite: Bigfoot or Sasquatch. I take no position on any of it. Fakers and fraud abound, but that is a side show to what could be out there. Or so they say. These two sites are interesting to peruse and consider, if you spend much time deep in the woods of the NW (Oregon Bigfoot).

Does Bigfoot/Sasquatch rank as funky dementia say like the Montauk Creature of UFO/Alien abductions? Just some light fun to pass the time and shake your head..up/down or sideways?

24
Sep
11

Yellow Jacket Nest (Mania, Insania, Pyromania)

Few things annoy or scare me more than a yellow jacket’s nest. Just a month ago, I was moving my daughter out of a house and a yellow jacket’s nest was evident, in a hole, beneath the front porch. I was uneasy as we moved her belongings (how does a little girl accumulate so much stuff?) out the door and down the porch. We finished without incident.

Yesterday, I let the dogs out the back door. I decided to do a bit of watering. I did the opposite of most people (who tidily store their hose after each use), I turned on the hose and knew the end was over in a direction near the deck. I could hear it running. I walked over to secure the business end of the hose and there was the business end of a yellow jacket’s nest. Agitated and impossible to track, the yellow jackets were moving in all manner of directions because of the running water. I could see the two inch hole and too many to count yellow jackets. I retreated and abandoned the idea of watering.

What’s the big deal you might ask. Leave them alone. Well, I have had three encounters with yellow jacket nests that did not fair well. Two with me getting attacked and one with my two older boys being savagely attacked. The existence of a nest unleashes a sort of revenge factor in me. 

I went out this morning to do just that. It was barely first light, say 0645 hrs. I had a plan. I won’t share it, because you’d think me crazy, dangerous and even perhaps cruel (seriously screw that…they need to be dead; I don’t care about their place in the pest eating scheme of things about now). They were already a blur of activity. My head lamp revealed dozens in a cloud of activity above the hole and steady stream of others heading out from the nest. The quiet time was not then to unleash my plan. I chose to retreat. Maybe tonight?

Of course, all the resources say the yellow jackets will die off in the Fall. Maybe I should wait. But, it is revealing of my nature to exact revenge for wrongs that took place decades ago. Now don’t confuse yellow jackets with bees. They are not of the same family. They belong to wasp family. They can sting repeatedly. I can attest to this. Ok, I have put the matches away. The shed door is locked.

Pouring gasoline on a nest is NOT the way to control yellow jackets. Gasoline will sterilize the soil, get into groundwater, and evaporate into the air we breathe. Gasoline is a mixture of materials, some of which are known carcinogens. When gasoline gets on you it is readily absorbed through the skin, which can also cause a chemically burn. Gasoline has become a popular cure for yellow jackets, with some people pour gasoline into a yellow jacket nest and then light it.  One gallon of gasoline has the explosive force equal to 83 sticks of dynamite, which is not good for our environment or our health. Please never attempt to control yellow jackets with gasoline!” RockDaleCounty.Org   (Obviously a volunteer fireman; Who would put a gallon of gasoline down a hole beneath his deck, which is attached to his house? 🙂 )

“First, decide if the nest actually poses a risk. If it is out of the way, it may be prudent to wait and let the nest die naturally in the fall. If removal is necessary, apply an approved insecticide directly into the nest opening. Use an approved “Wasp and Hornet” spray that propels a stream of insecticide 15-25 feet. Treatment is most effective in the evening when the majority of the insects are in the nest. Be sure to dress appropriately. Wear eye protection, a long-sleeved shirt, trousers and boots, and secure your sleeves and pant legs. Establish an unobstructed escape route and be ready to move quickly away if any of the bees fly towards you. If you require illumination, use a flashlight covered with red cellophane for light – wasps cannot see red. You may need to repeat the treatment two or three times on consecutive evenings. As there is some risk of being stung, you may wish to seek professional help. After a nest has been removed, be sure to fill any openings to prevent future entry.”  Master Bee Keeper

23
Sep
11

Fly Fishing: Reach Mend and Feeding Line

The reach cast is an easy way to throw an immediate mend into the fly line. Also, note the subsequent quick mends to feed line up through the guides and maintain the line in the feeding path without drag. This is a good way to feed a pattern downstream to waiting fish. I have lowered egg patterns down toward trout staged below  Chinook Salmon Redds

REACH MEND AND FEEDING LINE 

Michael Durham Salmon Photos & More

23
Sep
11

Fly Fishing: Evening Bite & Space Junk

Dr. Kaku's Universe @ Big Think (Michio Kaku)

Apparently, fly fishers in the Western Hemisphere are probably safe, at least in the Northern half of that hemisphere. But, anywhere else, if you are standing there fishing, you can probably rest assured you are  safe, although that 10-300# chunk of junk may create a noise as it hits the water or trees behind you. Make sure you collect that chunk, if feasible.

————————–

“Since the dawn of the Space Age, no one has been injured by falling space debris. The only confirmed case of a person being hit by space junk was in 1997 when Lottie Williams of Tulsa, Okla., was grazed in the shoulder by a small bit of debris from a discarded piece of a Delta rocket.

The odds of someone somewhere on Earth getting struck by the NASA satellite are one in 3,200. But any one person’s odds are astronomically lower— one in 21 trillion.

“You’re way more likely to be hit by lightning” than by the satellite, Mr. McDowell said.

The U.S. tracks the roughly 22,000 pieces of satellites, rockets and other junk orbiting the Earth”  WSJ

22
Sep
11

Fly Fishing: ‘Bow To the fish’

Well, I was going to write something about bowing to fish, should you be fortunate enough to hook a larger, airborne missile. So I queried ‘bow to fish’ and to my surprise there was a different take on bow to fish.

Some how 'bow to fish' produced this imagery. She does seem to know what she is doing.

So, I kept looking for the visual to best clarify my written words about fighting the bigger fish that goes airborne and how to lower the rod (‘bow’) toward the water. This provides slack in the fly line because the theory goes the fish will crash down on the water and below upon a slack leader thereby reducing the chances the line tension would break the leader or dislodge the hook. After the fish hits the water you regain tension to the fish. If a fish, as some species do, has a tendency to jump a lot, it is important to learn this technique whether fishing for tarpon or chasing airborne Kamloops trout while sitting in a pontoon boat. Slack does not mean too much slack…a learned, intuitive response to provide just enough slack then regain it to keep pressure on the fish. Side pressures versus upward pressures are beneficial in steering the fish. Of course, if you are hanging on for dear life then make sure you enjoy ‘the moment’. 

So you can see this whole bow to the fish is only as close to fly fishing as the fletchings on the butt of that arrow.

20
Sep
11

Asian Carp Invasion

Asian Carp TV on the Illinois River

20
Sep
11

Drop Shot Rig & A Fly? (Lots of Knots)

Drop Shot Rig & Palomar Knot  

I have not tried the drop shot rig with a fly line. I wonder how it would work for a vertical presentation, whether anchored up or drifting/kicking along and bouncing the bottom. The typical bare hook would be replaced by a fly with lots of action. The weight could be a simple split shot. The rig would not be cast via the normal casts, but rather lobbed or just dropped down as line is let out. I would be interested if anyone has experimented with this set up on lakes. Also, check out all the other knots at the NetKnots link.

Perhaps a pattern like these damsels would be a good choice to drop shot with. Any pattern with a bit of movement in the tail or body.




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