Archive for March 5th, 2012

05
Mar
12

Calico Bugger

A typical Woolly Bugger pattern. The tying stages are the basic..crimp the barb and slide on the bead...tie in the tail material (in this instance, two colors of burnt orange over purple marabou)...then tie on the body material (black with purple rug yarn) at the rear, tie in at the area over the flattened barb and tie in the grizzly hackle by the tip at the same spot. Wrap the body material forward to the bead. Then palmer the hackle forward with even spaces (note my gap) and tie off and then bind it down behind the bead and done. The Calico Bugger was a great fly for me years ago in B.C. and then I got away from tying it. I am going to tie up a half dozen and see if they produce this year on the lakes and even in the rivers. The body material could be dubbing or one of the newer chenilles as well.

05
Mar
12

Fly Tying: Macrame Caddis & FishNet Caddis

Nothing exceptional here. Basic pupa patterns that utilize the materials I found yesterday in a hoarding house. Tucked away in boxes since 1982, the materials  worked out just fine. An old macrame plant hanger from the 60’s & 70’s and a very old fish net were cut up for sections that formed the abdomens of the flies.

The two ply macrame yarn was cut for length and the yarn sections were separated. The piece of yarn was tied in at the mid section of the shank and wrapped back over toward the rear. The thread was advanced up to the end of the typical abdomen’s length. I then twisted the yarn tight like a Serendipity pattern and wrapped the yarn forward. The abdomen was completed at about the 2/3 point. The thread was half hitched off and cut. The bead was pushed back against the abdomen and then the thorax/head was dubbed for a spiky efffect.

The FishNet Caddis is a scraggly affair. Again, nothing too unique here beyond the fishing net used for the abdomen. In this instance the bead head is pushed against the eye of the hook and the deer hair thorax is wrapped in behind the bead and the abdomen.

05
Mar
12

Fly Tying: Materials As You Find Them

As a very few of you know, my last several years have often been devoted to elder health care (mom & aunt), hospice, death and the aftermath…hoarding homes cleanup on a vast scale (Hoarding Woes & You). Every now and then, I have come upon some small, barely salvageable items I believe would be great for fly tying. A piece of antron carpet, some fine copper wire, yarn and yesterday amidst a box containing plastic flowers and a dead possum…some awesome macrame‘d pot holder from the 70’s.

The macrame treasure was none the worse for wear despite this long resting critter who decided to find his/her final resting place atop a box of plastic flowers, plastic bags and the macrame treasure (well, at least I assess it to be one).

I saw that yarn, mottled and looking so Caddis like, so I extricated it, inspected it for bad ju ju and tucked it away. I also found an old fishing net, in bad shape, but cut away a swatch of it and added it for possible body material. I do this often, and I am sure you may as well…I see some material and inspect it for possibilities of fly tying: craft stores, Christmas/Birthday wrappings and as it were stuff tucked away in a long unvisited garage full of all manner of things. We shall see what I can create from the Possum Yarn and old net.

Salvaged 2 ply macrame yarn and some old fish netting.




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