Nook (noun); Old English (Nok): a corner, a sheltered spot, a small recess.

More often than not, the wind is a nemesis on a lake if you don’t anchor up or you have not identified sheltered areas to work on, at the edges of the wind. I fish from a pontoon boat. And, if there is a downside to that vessel it is the wind as it pushes you along like a giant sail. If I don’t anchor up, in the wind, and contend with the rolling waves, dragging anchor and thwarted back casts, I look for any small ‘nook’ or length of shoreline that gives a workable area to fish.

This is a an overview of Salmon L. in B.C. The Wind (black arrows) frequently came from the W/NW in June. I often found myself in a narrow area, out of the wind, shown by the yellow arrows. I would kick along the shoreline (catching fish) and when I reached an upper point I would turn and drift along the seam of wind/less wind. I was wind drifting and would control how fast I wanted to drift by how much I subjected my vessel to the wind. Often, the orange arrowed area (15 yards wide by 100 yards long) was the only respite and I must say it never failed to produce even if I was confined to a smaller merry-go-round. This area produced many beautiful Kamloops trout. The other end of the lake produced a similar area of safety, but I have fished it less.
Here, on a recent trip, the wind tore along on the far left (black arrow) like a river. A finger of land jutted out to provide a wind break. You can see the cat tails waving in the wind. This quiet area provided shelter and excellent fishing in the quieter spots against the bank (green arrows). I caught a half dozen fish through here. I would rest the water a bit after thrashing it up with a fish and again have success.
This was a beautiful Trout that took a Damsel dry pattern against the reeds in that sheltered back water ‘nook’…out of the wind.