So many notable fly anglers have passed on this past few years. Another, John Goddard passed the day after Christmas (2012). I admit I knew little of the man save a pattern the Goddard Caddis. But, upon a bit of reading in a recent news article, it is evident he was a true student of why trout ate the fly and we have benefited from his efforts.

John Goddard, born August 27 1923, died December 26 2012

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Fly: Larry Medina, Photograph: Hans Weilenmann (Danica Site)

 “…in the late 1950s, that Goddard began to develop his interest in entomology. Realising that if he were to catch more fish on this difficult river it would be helpful to invent more realistic patterns, he and a friend, Cliff Henry, decided to take life-size close-up photographs of the species of insect life on the river.

They brought the insects home, and in order to keep them still and arrange them in the correct position to be photographed, sedated them by holding them in a test-tube against a lit electric light bulb. “That winter we slaved away at the fly-tying bench,” Goddard later wrote, “trying to develop more imitative patterns with the help of these photographs.” (more)

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Photo from Wandel Piscators (Also, a nice piece about Goddard)