Archive for the 'Beginning Fly tying' Category



07
Nov
12

Peacock’s & Fly Tying: A Remarkable Bird

A design on a box for a cologne or some such scent. Caught my eye, so I snapped it.

Here’s a nice piece at Sexy Loops by Jo Meder re the ‘Fabulous Pheasant’

This peacock design was off the back of my ex-wife’s blouse. I snapped it as we watched our g-daughter at a sporting event. Hey, I saw the possibilities.

Peacock is, indeed, a remarkable tying material that comes in its natural colors but these days is also dyed. It is a wonderful material whether in its natural state or dyed. Tails, wings, abdomens, thorax and wingcases…it is a must have material. 

09
Sep
12

Fly Tying With Carpet Samples

Of late, well the last 2+ years, I have been preoccupied with hoarding houses (Mom/Aunt…Hoarding Woes & You). Today, I found this carpet sample deal and considered portions of it for fly tying.

Here the colors are more evident. This is short fibered carpet. Each twisted fiber is approximately 1/3″. I selected several colors. Each swatch is, of course, enough for several years of tying what? Caddis patterns, we shall see and I will share.

14
Aug
12

Swimmer Nymphs & Pheasant Tail Backstrap

The Swimmer Nymph: The slender bodied nymph that undulates to the surface film (as opposed to crawlers, clingers, borrowers). Blue Winged Olives generally fall into this category and are often considered, over all, one of the more important mayfly species to learn about. Below, Pheasant Tail fibers are an excellent material to help represent that slender, swimming body. It was also used here for the wing case and gives that fuzzy effect. The Pheasant Tail fibers were run back over the top of the abdomen and extended into the tail. I wrapped the wire ribbing forward over the top of the pheasant tail pieces to secure them (Skip Nymph technique for back strap over abdomen). Some, in a more exacting style, would opt for fewer pheasant tail fibers, say 3, in an attempt for matching the natural image (3 tails).

31
Jul
12

The Wet Fly Simply Put………………

An obscured view of the pattern here, because the simplicity of this pattern begs all manner of colors for the abdomen, thorax, thread color. Simple to tie and always a worthy offering to rising fish.

06
Jul
12

Fly Tying: Busy Movements

This pattern could be a scud or czech style nymph. With the trailing material is falls away from the established profiles. It could be explained as a ‘trailing shuck’ higher in the water column. But, maybe it doesn’t need any excuses. The excess materials have movement and colors to entice and provoke….hopefully. Experimenting with the depth and presentation may prove this ‘mistake’ to be successful. Part of the fun of tying is just experimenting.

28
May
12

The Barb, The Pliers, The Same Old Question

This post is about two things related to fly tying and fly fishing: the barb and the pliers needed to remove a hook from a fish. It usually should be an easy deal right? You barbed all the hooks as you tied the flies or you barbed the flies as you stuck them into your fly boxes. Right?

My waders hanging between uses. The telltale sign of hardware store pliers sticking out of my chest pocket.

Admission: Note to self to correct! I have at some point fallen into a habit of not barbing my hooks at the vise. I have become neglectful re this simple task. I rationalize that I will ‘simply’ de-barb the hook out on the water..no muss, no fuss. I suppose that is alright, but I have taken to using old, needle nose pliers. The groves extend up to the very tip and getting the barb between the grooves and flattening the barb has not been effective. How do I know this?

 When I hook a fish, the hook, which should, if de-barbed, easily back out of the fish doesn’t. It stays stuck because of the slightest elevated barb my pliers failed to flatten. I also notice this on the off chance the hook catches fabric. Again, the hook should back out through the fabric without snagging. Hmm? it seems to snag. So, I ask ‘the same old question’ Why don’t you barb the hooks at the vise where the process is easiest? Well, I kind of ask it like that…it is more like a sigh, an utterance and some thought of me at the table blowing off the process and pay for it now.

Beautiful Fly…but, there sets the barb.

So, two, no three obvious solutions: (1) barb them all at the table (2) buy barbless hooks (3) buy better pliers.

I cannot, personally, justify the $125.-175. spendy/trendy pliers suitable for freshwater/saltwater applications you see in shops. I imagine I would if I dealt with heavy wire, heavy mono etc. I know there are less expensive needle nose pliers out there so I will find them, if for nothing else removing the occasional fly that is inhaled deeply by the fish charging up from the rear.

So, the best solution for me, if I am adhering to Catch and Release, is to buy barbless hooks or de-barb all the hooks in advance and then proceed to tie….really no big deal. I just need to break the lazy habit I adopted.  

A Euro style Barbless Hook…Barbless hooks have been available for sometime. I never bought them preferring to barb my own. We see where that went……

Another side note here…a practical on the water issue: if you are teaching someone else and providing them the flies, a problem arises when they hook a fish on a fly you did not earlier barb and did not barb on the water. You assume they know to do that. They don’t. They might not be fully outfitted. Now if they get that fish in, they will most probably stress the fish repeatedly attempting to remove the barbed hook. If they hook themselves the hook will not back out nice and easy. If you are teaching someone make sure they have the tools and that their flies are barbless.

28
May
12

Marjin Fratnik’s “F” Fly Revisited

I have highlighted Marjin Fratnik’s F fly series before. I think it is a perfect beginner’s fly pattern that has many variations in color, size and applications (caddis, mayfly, chironomid, stonefly). My only personal caveat is regarding cutting the ends of any feather. I would rather spend the time to stack/sort the feathers so they are uniform in length rather than trim them….just my personal choice. None the less, it is a simple tie and the CDC is magical. I am linking to the always helpful FlyForumUk for the step by step (SBS) visual tutorial on tying the F Fly.

Fratnik’s F Fly at The Essential Fly

 




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