Archive for the 'Catch Trout' Category

16
May
16

Fly Fishing: Tippet (X Size to Pound Size)

A fly fishing technical posting about terminology in leader/tippet sizes. I’m always willing to share most, some…a few of my foibles. Either I am anal retentive or suffering from some degree of ADD or a combination. I have never cared enough to memorize the chart that tells one what approximate pound test matches what X number for leader constuction. Maybe it started when I read the disclaimer that different manufacturers had different diameters hence the charts were approximations. Well, hell, why bother. Well, you have to bother because the industry seems to care about the traditional X numbers for some reason (I was one of the slow ones sitting in the back of the classroom). So, because apparently I need to know more than 8x is cobweb and x1 is for steelhead, I am including a few charts for a Spring refresher. I spend a lot of time in the 4-6# range…no, the 5x-3x range.

02
Apr
15

Simplicity: Bead Head Pattern

Trout-release-photo-water-fly fishing-Oregon-SwittersB

Oregon Rainbow Trout…caught/released

The simple bead headed patterns fished as nymphs, flymphs or emergers are simple to tie and to fish on streams and lakes. Whether you tie them or find them in the shop/store/on-line, give them a try.

I tied the below pattern with a slightly over sized bead for greater density in pocket water settings. I plan on dredging through likely holding water for Searun Cutts and ‘bows real soon. Pattern: Size 14 barbless hook, copper bead, peacock abdomen/thorax, Starling feather wing/hackle, black 8/0 thread.

Copper Beaded Fuzz-SwittersB-Bead head-fly tying-fly fishing

This pattern would fit comfortably on a dime…to give you an idea of scale (for the non-fly fisher amongst you)

06
Jan
14

Sprucing Things Up……….

This coming year, I intend to Spruce things up more. To start, while searching the depths of streams, rivers and lakes, I intend to use the Spruce fly and other streamer/baitfish patterns more than I have. Of course, the Woolly Bugger complies with this intention to some degree, but even then I don’t use it as a baitfish imitation (in my mind’s eye). 

spruce fly ™ SwittersB

Spruce Fly

This is not an advocacy piece. It seems many fly fishers often use streamer/baitfish patterns. I seem to have some how never fully committed to their use. I have tied sculpin patterns, Muddler Minnows, Spruce flies, Matuka’s and assorted concoctions of rabbit and such for Bass. But, they are always a side experiment.

I suppose if I was searching for Brown’s I would more often use such patterns. But I don’t come across Brown Trout that much. But, the biggest Trout I have ever caught (13#, Central Oregon lake, 1995) came to a Spruce Fly. I have made this commitment several times over the years, but somehow fail to follow through.

Don’t try to figure out the photo. I am not sure why my son staged the fly with an old silver bracelet. But, there’s the Spruce Fly he tied.

07
Jul
12

Fly Fishing’s Small Stream Beauty

Small Stream Beauty by TMuncy

Small streams and their quiet, often abandoned secrets. Beautiful little fish that live in pockets and pools. Canopies of trees, rocky shores, tree roots and grassy banks. Colored pebbles and reflections of nature. Little hiding places, intimate escapes, places to contemplate and discover. 

 

25
Jun
12

Summertime, Warm Temps and Trout

Finding Trout, in lakes, during the Summer requires some thought. Oxygen, temperatures, inlets, outlets, channels, drops, food, structure…………SwittersB

SOME HELPFUL ADVICE FOR FINDING TROUT IN LAKES DURING THE SUMMER

Red Bead Bugger has been productive at times.

26
Jan
12

Fly Fishing: Small Sticks on Cricks

Several times a year, I find myself up logging roads toward upper drainages/tributaries of big rivers. I string up the 9′ to 9’6″ rod and set forth weaving my way, this way and that way, through the trees toward the waters edge. Once on the water, I scout the canopy and other over hanging growth to not only avoid hanging up the fly + tippet, but also to avoid smacking the rod tip.

The confines of a small stream quickly reveal the tangled web we weave when at first we use too big a stick on a small stream. Recently, I was privileged to review some DVD’s by Ed Herbst and in those DVD’s I noticed he was wielding short rods on narrow streams. He moved with ease, in stealth mode, and waved the little wand to delicately present his flies.

Now, this initially contradicts my impulse toward bigger waters, longer rods and more power. I have those rods and love them. But, those small streams are another enviro that beg the small stick. So, I invested in a couple Loomis rods, both 3 weights and shorter (7′ and 8′). For the last few years, I have used a 3 wt. (9′ St. Croix Legend) more and have handled some substantial trout on the 3 wt. These shorter rods have a softer, medium action and will most probably meet few fish beyond 14″….more like 6″ to 10″. If I do connect to a larger fish, it will be an epic story.

These are not rods for big rivers and big fish, which to my thinking would be potentially irresponsible if I am seeking a humane catch and release. These are sticks for little streams, the intimate confines and small flies. I am excited to use these on those private little escapes. Some of my best life time memories while fly fishing were on small streams.

25
Jan
12

Marble Trout of Slovenia & The Adriatic

There is, for me, a decided uniqueness to the Fly Tying and Fly Fishing of SE Europe. One part of that uniqueness is the available Marble Trout of Slovenia. A cousin of the Brown Trout, the fish reaches large size and lives in some of the most pristine rivers, which pour into the Adriatic Sea.

A Marble Trout from Josko.Org

Take a few minutes to study up on this unique fishery and the beauty of the region at JOSKO.ORG and at Fish & Fly. I think big flies (streamers, big stones and large morsels are in order)

“If you spend every day on the water casting tiny dry flies, you might have a lot of action but your chances of hooking a trout of a lifetime are slim to none. Monster marble trout eat sculpins, crayfish, big stoneflies and most of the time small grayling.” Fish&Fly

The Marble Trout is present in several countries bordering the Adriatic Sea, but Slovenia claims the fish as theirs. High in the mountains in the Soca and Idrijca Rivers the Marble Trout return.

 

06
Jan
12

Longing for……………

A warm Fall day. The crowds gone. Rustling reeds, a brush of warm breeze across the face. Anticipation for the take. No one around. Like your own private lake with a cabin on the hill in the distance amongst the Ponderosa. Bliss!

28
Dec
11

Fly Tying & Fishing with Ed Herbst and Friends

“…South Africa does not have an adequate record of  fly fishing evolution and development. Piscator, because it has been in unbroken publication since 1947, has performed that role in some measure and, as its editor for the past 15 years, I have always been aware of its importance as a journal of historic record. Many of the original pioneers are now dead but this DVD is an attempt to create a cinematic legacy.”

Recently, I was fortunate to receive a DVD from Ed Herbst entitled A South African Fly  Tying Journey with Ed Herbst and Friends. I found the DVD very enjoyable. Included in this work were fly patterns I had never seen before, as well as quite a few fly tying techniques also new to me. Ed Herbst, Fred Steynberg, Dean Riphagen and Tom Sutcliffe tie the fly patterns unique to the Cape.

Ed writes: “South Africa became the focus of global attention when we hosted the FIFA World Soccer Cup last year but not many fly fishers are aware that we have some very pleasant small streams about 90 minutes drive from Cape Town and it is these streams that have been the crucible of much development in small stream  fly fishing in this country.

The fly tying DVD can be purchased online through the Stream-X fly shop in Cape Town – http://www.streamx.co.za/index.htm  and its proprietor, Craig Thom – sales@streamx.co.za. An additional DVD re tying and fishing terrestrials designed in South Africa will be forthcoming in early 2012. Contact Craig Thom at the Stream X Fly Shop and order this first in a series of fly tying DVD’s and enjoy the tying and the gentlemanly camaraderie of the participants.

Ed Herbst and a Small Stream Rod/Reel

A side note: you will see Ed stalking trout in a beautiful small stream. He sent me a remark about that small stick… “Both the cover and the picture on the DVD itself show examples of the rod handles created by Stephen Boshoff in our never-ending pursuit of the ultimate small stream fly rod. The one on the DVD itself is a Scott 1 weight blank – alas no longer made  – and the reel is held on with plastic cable ties to reduce weight. To further reduce weight there is no butt capp and the blank is sprayed matte khaki to reduce fish-scaring rod flash.”

Thank you Ed for the most enjoyable gift of learning new concepts in fly tying and fly fishing.

22
Dec
11

Stillwater Fly Fishing: Working the Drop

East Lake (Oregon) One of my all time favorite lakes. Carrying a lot of surface ice in this picture, but the memories and anticipation to work this lake again linger through the Winter.

Fly fishing has so many possibilities. One of my favorite is figuring out a lake, pond, reservoir. Your observation skills are required on a lake as much as they are standing knee deep in a stream. Presentation on a lake is as important as on a stream. 

I frequently see lake fly fishers in their pontoon, float tube, raft etc. moving along, line extended behind and rhythmically kicking, drifting or rowing with only the slightest consideration given to a retrieve or to their position. We all do this at times while searching/discovering a new body of water. But, I would suggest that if you are out over 50′ of water with no discernible hatch/feeding activity you would be better served to move in toward the shoreline and attempt to study the contours of the lake. This may show you the structure and feeding zones where fish congregate for safety and food.

The drop is that area that transitions from somewhat shallow waters of say 10′ downward to deeper water. This drop off is prime in searching for trout that move up on the shoal to feed and move back off the shoal for safety and food as well. At a minimum work parallel to this drop and present your fly up on the shoal if hatch/feeding activity is apparent or work the fly down into the drop off area and slightly deeper. 

Anchoring and fishing toward the drop (toward the shoreline) or up on the shoal can be productive. If you are not anchored, the wind or the torque of your casting can push you back out of the productive waters. This results in a lot of kicking or rowing to hold position and disturbances that may put the fish off the bite.

Sometimes the insect that is emerging, say Damsels or Gray Drakes, are actually moving toward shore to stage for their ‘hatch’. You would want to position yourself on the shore or in close to shore and cast out away from shore then slowly work your Damsel or swimming Mayfly pattern back toward shore to mimic the Damsels moving just below the surface toward the shoreline reeds, weeds and structure.

Here is a piece by Herman deGalat at HookFlyFishing that highlights several of these points on fishing the drop and the presentation.

East Lake after a successful day. SwittersB




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