Archive for the 'Stillwater Fly Fishing' Category

15
Sep
15

Box of Woolly’s…

Woolly Buggers-fly pattern-fly box-SwittersB

04
Mar
14

Effective Stillwater Fly Fishing (Michael Gorman)

photo-Effective Stillwater Fly Fishing-Gorman-SwittersBI pointed to this new book a few weeks back. I obtained a copy and it is an excellent book. Beyond the basics, the book pays attention to the mental planning and presentation for the Stillwater Fly Fisher. I highly recommend the book and of course it has inspired me to start my planning for the months ahead until I can launch the vessel and enjoy the chase. Effective Stillwater Fly Fishing

21
Feb
14

Nature & the Dragon Fly: Amazing

The ever inspiring Marc Fauvet at Limp Cobra presented this Vimeo vid by Andy Holt. I was so inspired by it for a multitude of reasons: photography, videography, nature, fly fishing presentation, fly tying, habitat, entomology. If you are into insects, macro photography, fly fishing, the outdoors then you need to watch it! Even you photo buffs who focus on urban lines and rock scapes will enjoy this effort by Andy Holt. Please give it a watch and enjoy.

photography-dragon nymph-Andy Holt-fly fishing-SwittersBI took this screen shot during the Andy Holt Vimeo and the detail is remarkable. For the fly tier, the clarity for tying is exciting. The eye structure, the abdomen shape and ribbing lead to the possibilities of materials and flash/segmentation. The legs, darker backstrap are equally important. I have always been enamored with Dragonfly Nymphs as a fly pattern option in stillwaters. 

Photography-Dragon Fly-Emerger-Andy Holt-SwittersB-Vimeo

20
Feb
14

Effective Stillwater Fly Fishing by Michael Gorman

I have read work by Michael Gorman before related to stillwater (lakes) entomology. I was impressed not only with the clinical thoroughness of the effort but by the practicality of it as well. This new book by Michael Gorman promises to be equally beneficial to my learning and I look forward to getting it soon. Mike is an Oregon based angler and is well versed in all aspects of fly fishing.

MGorman StillwaterOn the back cover of the book is a comment, which I particularly appreciate: “Gorman approaches stillwater fly fishing as a puzzle and views challenging days as a chance to put together the pieces and enjoy the most cerebral, rewarding parts of the sport.”

That, for me, is the essence of the sport and keeps it in the proper perspective…as an ongoing learning experience. I think this would be an excellent addition to your library as well as mine.

Stackpole Books

29
Mar
13

Early Season Warmth & Cold Water

The early season forces of nature conflict: the sun’s warmth barely touches the depths of the water. The wind blows across the lake’s surface and the skin feels the chill of the dissolved ice. The hands are cold from the trout’s skin. Releasing the trout back into the water numbs the hands. You then sit back, look upward and smile as the sun’s warmth bathes your face. 

bowtatsilver

Not the biggest trout, not the most colorful, but aggressive and tough.

 

23
Feb
13

Damsel’s: Sleek and Seductive

While on Stillwaters fly fishing, we often see the delicate cousins of the more aggressive Dragon flies…the Damsel fly flitting about in the reeds and shoreline structures. Newly emerged they are often pretty blues, browns and greens. The subsurface life of these attractive insects is equally appealing for the fly fisher too.

The above photo of the Damsel ‘nymphs’ provides perfect detail for the fly tier looking for exactness or simplicity. Sleek, segmented, bulbous eyed, long legged and tailed one can see the proper proportions and just where the undulating damsel would have appendages,etc. 

damselssbMy suggestions re Damsel nymphs (Instars) is to fish them slowly amongst the shoreline structures and picture intermittent propulsions like a fish would move…wiggling, undulating. The materials you use to tie (or someone else used) will help facilitate the suggestion of life. Here is a BC piece re Damsel nymphs.

Tie up some sleek, life like Damsels and fish them with confidence. Tie them in the  length range of 3/4″ to 1″ and keep them slender. Floating or Intermediate lines work best. Present them parallel to the shoreline or even swimming toward the shoreline or reeds as opposed to out into the deeper part of the lake. Study up on how the Damsel moves/propels itself. Also, imagine the journey to emerge out of the water and how you would present your pattern amidst the climbing nymphs.

damsel caught

This beautiful trout was caught close to a shoreline of cat tails this past Summer. An olive colored, size 10 damsel nymph fished on the drop near the reeds did the trick.

21
Nov
12

Herman Botes’ Papa Roach (Dragon Fly Nymph)

A few days ago I showed a series of Dragon fly nymphs that I have tied over many years. Some have been very productive, some never turned a head. It was a compilation of pictures to show the materials options and concepts.

Well, as often happens with visitors here, they suggest alternatives, better options that others have created out there. The fine folks at FLYLOOPS.NET pointed to a piece at Tom Sutcliffe’s site, which highlights Herman Botes Papa Roach pattern. 

Herman Botes’ Papa Roach Pattern

 




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