Posts Tagged ‘Aquaculture

09
Aug
12

Stop Omega Protein! Menhaden Too Important

Menhaden in Danger

Have you heard of the Menhaden fish? Maybe on the East Coast of the U.S. you have. Beyond living there and reading about this fish, you like me are probably not well informed about this important fish in the Atlantic Ocean. Well next time you pop your Omega 3 pill or feed your cat or fertilize your plants you may want to evaluate the utilization of this fish.

Some call it the most important fish swimming in the Atlantic. Read more about the value of this decimated fishery and how the destruction will, not may, reap havoc on the Atlantic fishery. 

“Like any good mystery, this one has a prime suspect. Across the Chesapeake and about sixty miles to the south of where Price stands, a seaside factory hums and buzzes, filling the small town of Reedville, Virginia, with the putrid smell of menhaden chum. The looming smokestacks, warehouses, and pretty much everything else on Reedville’s Menhaden Road are owned by Omega Protein, a publicly traded company headquartered in Houston with a long and storied history of industrial fishing in Atlantic waters.

The operation is high-tech. Spotter planes take off from Reedville’s tiny airstrip to circle swathes of ocean, looking for the telltale shadow of menhaden moving by the million just below the surface. Pilots radio Omega Protein’s fleet of nine refurbished World War II transport ships, one of which dispatches two smaller boats that surround the school with a giant net called a purse seine, drawing the fish tightly together using the mechanics of a drawstring sack, until all the members of the school can be sucked out of the ocean with a vacuum pump. The boats can “set” the net twelve to fifteen times a day; a vessel will return to port with millions of menhaden aboard.

Harvested by the billions and then processed into various industrial products, menhaden are extruded into feed pellets that make up the staple food product for a booming global aquaculture market, diluted into oil for omega-3 health supplements, and sold in various meals and liquids to companies that make pet food, livestock feed, fertilizer, and cosmetics.” 

Use all them darn Tilapia!!!

25
Jul
12

Tilapia, the Invasive Choice

 

Michael Rupert Hayes, Hyco Reservoir, N.C.

The Issue
     "There are some serious trade-offs in aqualculture, evident in
the case of tilapia, one of a handful of fish breeds that are seen
as being the future of freshwater aquaculture.  The species is
highly carnivorous and its continued large-scale introduction could
contribute to the extinction of less aggressive, indigenous fish
throughout the world.  As aquaculturists recognize this and
research universities and institutes like the Consultative Group on
International Agricultural Research are experimenting with better
techniques and hybrids, development agencies such as USAID and the
World Bank continue to push for the spread of tilapia throughout
the world.  Tilapia is now being farmed in more than 85 countries. 
A lack of international and industry-wide regulation, coupled with
real food needs and implementing agencies' relative lack of concern
over species loss could mean that the destructive fish wins out in
a perhaps unnecessary trade-off between environmental, economical,
and food concerns." (more)

Well now, you can see that the U.S. has nothing to worry about the invasive nature of Tilapia in our waters. That’s their problem right?

Of course, those ever important and intrusive U.S. agencies, many have so much faith in, have been ever diligent to balance the habitat vs. entrepreneurial opportunities when it comes to Tilapia rearing. So fish farming of Tilapia is here in some degree. Where will those rearing ponds be in relation to waterways? The effort to farm Tilapia has been around in the U.S. for a good 15 years or more. On the Invasive Species List


 

05
Nov
11

Fish & Habitat Management by Mote Marine Laboratory

“Why, after a century of stocking marine fishes into the wild, is there still so little understanding of the effects and effectiveness of marine stock enhancement? Historically, little emphasis has been placed on understanding the impacts of stocking on fisheries landings. The approach to marine stock-enhancement during most of the 20th century can be characterized as the Production Phase, the period when all of the emphasis and accountability in stocking programs was focused on aquaculture production and release magnitude. This emphasis on production is pervasive, even today, and has overshadowed critical questions about stocking effects on fisheries landings and fish populations.”

MOTE MARINE LABORATORY is not only involved in research re aqua culture but also the production of wetland plants. They are growing fish and plants. Interesting to see how this habitat/stability concept works for the Atlantic/Gulf Coasts.

10
Jan
10

Trout Aquaculture for New Zealand?

Federated Farmers backs restarting aquaculture (NZ)

“Strategically, aquaculture has major economic potential for New Zealand that needs to be harnessed in order to grow our economy.

“20 percent of the diet for some 2.6 billion people is made up of fish protein and over the next four decades, the world’s human population will expand by some 3.7 billion people. That’s a big reason to give our farmers the legislative means to realise the opportunity,” Mr Nicolson concluded.   NZ Aquafarming




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