Posts Tagged ‘Artificial fly

24
Nov
13

Fly Tying: Casual Dress Nymph

Casual dress SwittersBNice Step By Step Casual Dress Tutorial by Goldenstone FF

Many years ago (1980), I bought Polly Rosborough’s Fuzzy Nymphs book and of all his flies, the Casual Dress Nymph was most appealing and successful for me. I highly recommend the pattern. The color scheme is traditionally as depicted. The tail can be the original fox fur or hackle fibers or rabbit fur guard hairs. Above I used the brown hen hackle barbules. In some instances you will see it without a tail and suggestive of a Caddis pupa. Tumbled down streams or retrieved upward through stillwaters, it is an excellent nymph pattern. 

Fuzzy Nymphsxx

12
Jul
13

Fly Tying: The Scale of it all………….

I routinely show fly patterns here and most often in a macro format. My intent is to show the fly’s proportions, materials and the good and bad outcomes that the macro lens never fails to gather. I thought this time I would also include a shot of the fly pattern shown in the macro shot also in a pose with a U.S. dime in order to show scale. The hook size is more relevent to the tier. 

CaliNymphSwittersB Dime

Calibaetis Nymph SwittersB

This is a Callibaetis Mayfly stillwater (lakes) pattern on a size 16 hook.

AmberBH Dime SwittersB

AmberBH SwittersB

This is a traditional (well at least for the last 20 years) Bead head (BH) Pupa pattern, on a size 14 hook, that is suggestive of a Caddis Pupa drifting in a stream/river or presented to rise in a lake. The ubiquitous bead head in pupa patterns aids sinking and provides a little flash where the light penetrates the surface, The body is comprised of dubbing materials that are suggestive of movement, flash and segmentation while the fly drifts by.

Blues Dime SwittersB

Blues SwittersB

The Blues is a wet fly tied on a size 14 hook that is suggestive of any number of insects that drift in the upper stratas of a lake or stream. The blue is eye catching to fish (purple is excellent too…see PlanetTrout blogsite re his experiments with purple) and the Starling wing is one of my favorite wing materials ahead of a thorax ball to help splay the wing material.

The dime shot gives one a good idea of the actual size of these big macro flies. The hook sizes are good references for the fly fisher, but the non tier has a better reference with the coin perhaps.

25
May
13

Fly Tying: Sparser Dressings Provoke

Over dressing a fly pattern abdomen, thorax and wing is easy to do. The temptation is to do this because visibility of the fly is increased…life like appearances might be enhanced…the shape may be more realistic.

wet2wet1

Tying sparser (much like tying on smaller hooks) is a leap of faith for many. Here is a nice review of the sparsely dressed Flymph patterns at Bakslengen (Vegard Jønnevald).

Bucky PLaying Lunker Wet SB

Stillwaters really test your faith in smaller patterns, once one gives up the comfort of Woolly Buggers and the like. Here my wife plays a nice stillwater trout that took a small, sparsely dressed wet in the film during a Chironomid (Midge) emergence.

My patterns above, although quite productive, are over dressed in comparison to some of the sparser dressed patterns that do attract a fish’s attention. Skinnier bodies, one turn or less of hackle and fewer thread wraps produce a sparsely dressed fly that does produce.

Bucky Trout SB

23
Mar
13

Fly Tying: Seeing Red…………..

Red used to be a hot spot of sorts for fly patterns. The fly patterns that sat in plastic bins in hardware stores (pre-flyshop/online sales days) sometimes had that red hackled-fibered tail. There has been a recent spurt of hot colored beads and hackles that allow for that insertion of a bright ‘hot spot’ to perhaps attract the take.

hot spots collage

If you do any research on colors and their visibility in water, you learn the color red supposedly fades first as it descends down through the water…past depths of 10 feet. Is it even worth the effort to include a hot spot? Is red even visible on that tail or beard (suggesting gills or blood)? Well, I have experimented with hot colors of orange, blue, chartreuse, red and have had the best results with red.

streamer beard sbExperimentation is a very special part of fly tying and fishing for me and many fly fishers. Experiment with colors. Sometimes it is a one time success and sometimes the experiment yields years of special moments. All part of the fun.

22
Mar
13

Fly Tying: Size Comparison Charts (redeux)

I originally posted this back in ’09. It is a very handy piece about how to compare sizings one encounters in fly tying discussions. It is handy to ‘bookmark/favorite’ this for future reference. The links are included.

tying-tools-swittersb

You will often see the size of a fly represented in hook size or in mm’s. I have never easily adjusted to metric and have a rough sense of flies in the 5mm to 60mm range. But, I need to actually see the graph to be sure. I enclose these charts for visuals, realizing you will refer to a ruler, etc.

Bead Chart to Left, courtesy of Wingaersheek Flies

Example:

Natural Insect: Black Winter Stonefly (Family: Capniidae)

Imitation: Black Elkhair Caddis

Hook Size: 18-22

So, notice a 5mm fly is about the equivalent of a size 18 to 22  hook. Many references world wide will always utilize mm references for insect size, pattern size, bead size or compare hook size (standard references) to an insect size (in mm’s)

PRESCOTT FLY FISHERS HATCH INFORMATION

23
Nov
12

Palmered Hackle: Do It In the Front…Do It In the Rear

What? There are two styles of palmering hackle. Each has its devotees and advocates. I almost always palmer rear to front and I rarely reinforce palmered hackle. If the hackle comes apart from the teeth of fish, well that is something to behold and enjoy! Who cares. If it comes apart by any other means…that should be exceedingly rare. Nonetheless, here are the two methods of palmering the hackle…… The ‘right way’ is now front to rear with wire ribbing wound rear to front over the palmered hackle. Either way one does it, the hackle can be ribbed with wire, tinsel or thread.

This fly has the hackle palmered rear to front with no ribbing.

FRONT TO REAR PALMERED HACKLE (the ‘right way’)

FRONT TO REAR PALMERED HACKLE (the ‘right way’)

REAR TO FRONT PALMERED HACKLE  (the old right way)

 

20
Nov
12

Big Gulp: Damsel Dry Fluttering By

I mentioned after a recent stillwater (lake) fishing trip that I had particular fun fishing a Damsel dry pattern. In all my years I never used a Damsel dry. So good was the damsel ‘nymph’ patterns that I just stuck with them. But, a few years back, I had witnessed my son using a Damsel dry to good effect and decided if ever again in that situation I was going to give it a try.

You can barely see the Damsel Dry sticking out of the Trout’s mouth (left side)

On this recent trip I had three Damsel dries. I lost one to a tree; one to the reeds and one to a fish. Several memorable fish came to the fluttering dries before I finally lost the last one. The flies are wind resistant and make that noisy fluttering sound as they zing past your ear. The wing material (Spirit River’s Wings Mottled Lt. Dun) is air resistant. But, especially in the mornings and again in the evening, the pattern was very productive and durable.

Different wing materials could be used whether feathers or synthetic. I have just used the ‘zing wing‘ like material because it looks more realistic to me. The wings, although swept back in the photo, similar to a Damsel at rest (Damsels to rear; Dragons to the side), the wings flutter about and as the fly lands the wings take different positions in the water’s surface. I also made the wings larger than normal for floatation and attraction. In the fish photo above, the protruding fly has that bright blue hackle. I don’t have any of that right now, but I think I might add a turn of that just behind the eyes soon. I will also make more of an effort to splay the wings slightly to the side…at least for the photo op portion.

Black, 8/0 thread…size 12, 2x fine dry fly hook…Hairline Damsel Blue braid for extended abdomen…Hairline’s Senyo Laser Dub (black/blue)…wing Spirit River’s Wings & Things mottled light dun…eyes by Spirit River black mono eyes, medium size for attraction quality.

20
Nov
12

Fly Tying: Dragon Fly Pattern Options

There are reportedly 5800+ species of  Dragon flies on this planet. For fly fishing purposes, it can be simplified down to one simple concept (dare I say that) and that is re the shape of the nymph. Longer, sleeker or shorter, rounder. Both styles of nymphs are predatory and excellent patterns to deploy beneath the water’s surface particularly in lakes, or slower, backwaters of rivers. BC Info re Dragons

Wisconsin Water Monitoring Group Photo

05
Nov
12

Wet Palm

For the non-tying, non-fly fisher, the flies shown are generally called a ‘wet fly’ and presented subsurface from just below the water’s surface and deeper. For the tier…these were tied on a size 14 stout hook, but the body was reduced in size for a smaller fly on a bigger hook. The ribbing should have been a bit finer in thickness, but the segmentation does pop with the lighter colored ribbing. How does my life line look?

23
Oct
12

Fly Tying: Lil’ Grey Nymph (Simple Gem)

The Lil’ Grey Nymph: I have posted before re this simple fly I came up with (I didn’t want to say ‘designed’) several years ago. I want to point to it again because several times, this past Summer, it was so productive I had to grin and shake my head given the flies simplicity. You can mix up the body color and ribbing color, but keep it sparse and smallish (14-18). Don’t fret over the bushy tail, although it can be trimmed to fewer fibers. Give it a try and let me know if you have success with it. 

 




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