Posts Tagged ‘buzzer

09
Dec
13

Buzzers, Bombers, Midges, Chironomids: Year ’round staple

Midge Head SB Excellent Info re Chironomids~Midges by Philip Rowley@Fly Craft Angling

Midges (Buzzers, Chironomids, Chironomidae, Diptera, Gnats, Bombers, Bloodworms) are a staple for trout. Midges can comprise a significant portion of a trout’s diet in some lakes or rivers. Sizes vary, but tend toward the small offerings in larva, pupa, emerger, adult patterns. Type in Chironomid into Google Images and you will get the overview of this simple food form. Watch for swooping/feeding birds above the water’s surface as an indicator of a hatch.

15
Mar
12

Fly Tying: Foam Wing Midge

Fly Tying Chironomids (Midges, Buzzers, Gnats). I have plenty of larva/pupa patterns. I am about done tying up little fluff balls for the dries and emergers. Last year (Spring), I tied a lot of smallish (18-22) thread bodied flies with one turn of hackle and a tuft of CDC. This year, I am replenishing a larger pattern, The Foam Winged Midge, that I have tied before. I have enough now for the next few years. 

I started tying these back in December, but fell away from tying many due to life's distractions. I have now finished a couple dozen of these and that should suffice for a few years. The only derivation for this pattern is the ribbing of Krystal Flash over the peacock herl. You could use a variety of colors for some flash. I use the KFlash because of weight considerations. Even thin wire has tended to pull the fly under, over riding the foam wing's ability to support the fly in the film.

11
Dec
11

Fly Tying: Down to the Gnat’s Ass

A simple beginner's midge pattern to tie. A size 14-18 fine wire hook, an abdomen of one barb of pheasant tail and one strand of green kystal flash wrapped up the shank together. The hackle is one wrap of dry fly quality grizzly and the small tab of foam in figured eighted atop the shank and then covered with a few wraps of peacock herl. The rear end of the fly will ride slightly downward and the wing/foam will support the fly in the film. SwittersB

The fly fishing literature will advise you that midges-chironomids-buzzers are available year around as a dry fly/emerger option. The above pattern is, at a size 16, on the large size for most streams/rivers, but suitable for many lakes. 

Study up on the larva, pupa, emerger and dry fly patterns that work from the muck up onto the surface. Dry, Emerger, and droppers are suitable for rivers, but you are advised to know your larva/pupa patterns when fishing  the vertical presentation of a lake.

By no means the only resources, but you would be well served to study UK and BC literature on how to tie and present Chironomid patterns. The buzzer, midge, gnat, chironomid/bloodworm designations are more regional in use and in no way are separate insects. As a rule, the UK=Buzzer, BC=Chironomids and the US=Midge….are uniform in tying and presentation, with variations, of course, as in all fly tying/fly fishing.

The midge patterns are simple to tie (particularly larva and pupa patterns) yet very effective. They are always there, so have the necessary assortment of options.

26
Sep
10

Fly Fishing: Evolution, Design, Mentor

This attached piece by David Cammiss @ LearnFlyTying has quite a few lessons within re the fly fishing culture: mentoring, fly design, peer pressure, culture pressure, upgrading gear, personal adaptation and success. In this one short article, there are several realities within the sport. I particularly like ‘the local taking pity’ part. Long ago, I had several episodes, streamside, where gentlemen, in their senior years, imparted subtle, significant information to me that increased my success and enjoyment for years to come. I, to this day, derive great satisfaction in passing on that tradition.

“After trying to match their casting distance with my 10ft. Hardy Palakona split cane rod and a badly cracked level fly line I was absolutely shattered and demoralised. The following day I tried again and initially had no success. One of the locals took pity on me and asked to have a look at my tackle and flies. He had a look in my fly box and picked out a size 10 Teal and Red wet fly. He took out his scissors and cut off the teal wing. He handed me my mutilated fly and told me to give it a try on the point.” Intro to Buzzers

28
Aug
10

Fly Tying: Shuttlecock Buzzer (Fore & Aft CDC Wings)

Ok, bare with me, but I tied these in a hurry to demonstrate a CDC wing tied in at the eye (standard) and back at the bend. The Shuttlecock Buzzer, here, was tied on a size 16 light wire hook. The body is 8/0 black thread. First I tied in two small plumes of CDC for the wing. I wrapped a tinsel body and overwrapped/ribbed it with the black thread. I spun and dubbed a small amount of synthetic dubbing. The fly was tied off at the eye, under the CDC wing. The trick is to not catch fibers of the CDC in the half hitches as you tie off.

The above Shuttlecock Buzzer is unique with the CDC Wing first tied in at the rear at the bend. I then tied in a single strand of peacock Krystal flash, then dubbed a small thorax and then wrapped the thread body back and forth a couple of times. I finished by ribbing the Krystal Flash strand up the body and tied the thread off at the eye. This fly was also tied on a size 16 hook.

Neither pattern is that crisp, but they help show the wing to the front and the more unique wing over the bend of the hook.

08
Jan
10

Fly Tying: Bubble Back Midge (Cool Concept by Hans Stephenson)

Vodpod videos no longer available.

This is a simple, unique pattern that is a nice little midge pattern. I wonder if the elevated bubble with the undercut edge of the bead would afford a good way to tie a parachute pattern? Well, that is perhaps over thinking it…as is, it is a good little pattern.

21
Nov
09

Midge Mania

Some would say cursed (my kids) by the afflictions of always on time (actually early) and Semper Paratus…I am often arriving early to meetings and killing time sitting in the rig or as I have come to do…wandering a bookstore. Recently, I was killing time in Medford, Oregon at a Barnes & Noble and came across a book that begged the question ‘how many variations of a chironomid/midge can there possibly be to warrant a sizeable book?’ Apparently many. Sorry for the cell phone blur…but you get the idea…

The book has a nice layout and covers every conceivable variation of chironomid, midge, buzzer, gnat…. you are bound to find something new to experiment with…I did. I did not spring, but given the detail and thoroughness of the book, it is worth the price (I won’t quote, given the various resources out there to acquire books in the store or online).




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