Posts Tagged ‘Caddis



28
Jul
11

Fly Tying: Fore & Aft Patterns

I am by no means a fly pattern historian. I leave it to others to delve back through the annals of fly tying. The fore and aft style fly pattern is reputed to have originated in England over a century ago. Most patterns (save those with new synthetic materials) probably had multiple originators in the far corners of the fly tying/fishing world.

The fore and aft is often offered up as a midge cluster. Well, that seems fine for a very small pattern, say size 16 to 20, but my experience with say the Renegade pattern is it has done amazingly well in B.C. lakes as a Caddis pattern beneath the surface. I recall a small, remote lake near Wavy L. that to this day afforded some of the most amazing fly fishing I have ever experienced. The Renegade pattern was in tatters, with the tinsel and rear hackle trailing behind. There were no chironomid/midge in sight. Only, Caddis/Sedge were emerging and skittering. As tempting as it was to put on a large dry Caddis pattern, the sunken Renegade was intoxicating to the fish and to me. I will never forget the fly line zipping through the water as the Kamloops took the fly and jetted off across my path. 

Whether the body in tied thinly or rather plump, like the Renegade, experiment with the fore and aft hackling on a pattern. Try it as a searching pattern where exact dry fly /emerger pattern presentations are not called for. Lakes and busy surface streams would be good choices. The hackles can be the dry fly quality feather or even a softer hackles for a busier look. I have include a Renegade I tied and a Stick Fly (midge) pattern that shows Ostrich Herl for the hackle. 

07
Jun
11

Fly Tying: Caddis Pupa Pattern

COOL PUPA PATTERN BY LEIF EHNSTROM

Hatches Magazine provides a very nice pattern (S-B-S/pics) for a Caddis Pupa that uses a latex product, Nymph Skin, to form the abdomen. A nice pattern of the bead head pupa variety. Good visuals.

04
Jun
11

Fly Fishing: Tandem of Yellow Sally Nymph & Green Rockworm?

I recall last Summer having good success along the riffles of the McKenzie River while fishing separately a nymph (Large Hare’s Ear, size 8-10) and also a Green Rockworm Larva pattern. I am going to experiment in the months ahead with dredging a shorter line, while offering two flies at once through the riffles. I will probably stay with a larger, weighted, Gold Bead Head, Gold Ribbed, Hare’s Ear for the Yellow Sally Nymph (Family Perlodidae/Genus Isoperla) and a version of the Green Rockworm larva (Caddis, Genus Rhyacophila). The Jersey Angler provides a worthy pattern for the Green Rockworm and some good pictures of the larva and his pattern The Cooper Bug.

Employ the standard nymphing rig, cast/lob/sling with a more open loop to avoid tangles of two flies, strike indicator if you use one and split shot (that would be a mess wouldn’t it?). Certain Czech Nymphs would also provide excellent pattern options for the Green Rockworm Larva.

I suggest the two patterns in one offering because they inhabit the same waters and are equally vulnerable to drift and are active during the same span of Summer. If the two fly rig is two cumbersome then keep both insects in mind for subsurface presentations, and of course, watch for the activity on the surface as Caddis come off or the Yellow Sally comes off (if you research the literature re Yellow Sally’s ’emerging’ it is often said then crawl toward shore or up onto rocks to hatch as most Stoneflies do…. however, there are some members of the Yellow Sally that emerge out of the water like a Mayfly on the run…I witnessed this last year on the McKenzie River and commented re that back then). Regardless, have your Elk Hair Caddis and larger, cream colored wet fly or Stimulator like patterns available for surface activity too.

01
Jun
11

Fly Fishing: Rising or Diving Caddis

LaFontaine Sparkle Pupa (SwittersB)

Caddis patterns are fun to fish because the take is often aggressive. Whether you are swinging a pupa pattern along bottom or swinging it up toward the surface, the takes are solid. Fish often leap out of the water on lakes in pursuit of emerging (escaping) Caddis. But, another consideration is female Caddis returning to the surface and diving down to lay eggs. This diving (sinking) presentation is less often considered, but has been successful for me on lakes. I have  seen feeding activity and mistaken it for feeding upon emerging adults. Rising or Diving, the Pupa like patterns are a good offering. Even a dry (Elk Hair Caddis/Hairwing patterns) pulled under can serve in a pinch with a bit of shot (if allowed) a foot or so above the fly, or with a sinking line, or a heavier bead head nymph above the Caddis pattern. Many of the Caddis Pupa/Bead Head Pupa patterns, one sees these days, will suffice for this presentation. Check Google Images (or Scroogle Images-less selection-if you are a rebel) for patterns and see the variety of tying options. Bright greens are attractive, as depicted here, but earth tones are always a good bet.

Bead Head Pupa (SwittersB)

26
May
11

Fly Tying & Fishing: Mother’s Day (and beyond) Caddis

RICK HAFELE ON THE BRACHYCENTRUS OCCIDENTALIS CADDIS

26
May
11

Fly Tying: Overdressing the Fly

Often, simple, underdressed patterns are better producers. I tend toward the ‘if one wrap is good, two is better’ style. Give the materials, you apply to the shank, room to move, pulse, wiggle. Overdressing causes much of the materials to collapse or compress and be of little value other than thickness. Usually, this is too much thickness if you look at real life insects. 

Overdressed Shroud on Beaded Caddis Pupa

The above pattern has an Antron shroud similar to LaFontaine’s Caddis pupa patterns. It is a little heavy and the underbody of amber brown beads will be lost. The below pattern is a slightly better result with an Antron/CDC shroud.

Slightly less shrouded pupa

Below is an even sparser shroud; perhaps too sparse. However, this gives you an idea of how one pattern can have several looks with the application of materials that either reveal or hide important parts of a pattern’s body.

Sparse Shroud, Beard/Underwing

   

22
May
11

Fly Tying: Caddis Pupalicious II

Ok, I have these OCD moments that fixate me upon some facet of tying. Over the years: peacock, ostrich, CDC, Ice Dub, craft store boas. Of late, deer hair collars for legs/antenna/wings on Caddis Pupa/Adult patterns. I first saw this over on Westfly when Jeff Morgan was twist dubbing deer hair. I have since become increasingly fascinated with the possibilities.

This is a simple, beginner’s pattern “guaranteed” to produce. Ok, I had to throw in that sort of thing. But, I instinctively do know this is a worthy pattern for rivers or lakes. Remember presentation is critical to any pattern: is this pattern being dredged in riffles, swung and lifted up through the water column, diving down to lay eggs? 

Regardless, here is how you tie it: The hook can range from a size 10 to 16, given the materials used; they take up space so a smallish hook in not practical. Here it is a size 12, 2xl shank, nymph hook. The thread  used was black 8/0. I wrapped a layer of lead onto the shank at the mid point, about 6 wraps and overlaid those wraps with thread, then head cement.

Then I created a dubbing loop and inserted strands of a synthetic dubbing material between the thread loop. The loop was spun into a dubbing noodle and then wrapped up the shank like a small rope. About two thirds of the way up the hook shank (the abdomen area), I stopped and tied off the dubbing noodle, removing the remainder.

The thorax/head area remained. I formed another dubbing loop and applied tacky wax. I took pieces of cut deer hair, black in color, and touched dubbed (Gary LaFontaine concept) them to the tacky thread loop. The dubbing crook is carefully spun and the deer hair is trapped between the tightening loop. One again a few wraps of the dubbing (deer hair this time) are wrapped in the thorax area. Tie off the extra upon reaching the head area and cut. Then form a thread head and finish. Mix up the body colors to match the various Caddis in your waters, the deer hair could be black, brown, or even natural. 




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