Posts Tagged ‘Czech nymphing

19
Jun
11

Fly Fishing: Getting Down to Business

Split Shot

Ah, split shot. Maybe for awhile they stay in a small zip lock bag or plastic tube. Eventually, for me, they are scattered in vest pockets, pontoon side cargo pouches, wader pockets, gear bags, fanny packs…….. They are everywhere. So why don’t you use a bit more when it counts…on your leader above or below the fly. If it is legal to attach to your leader (check reg’s…if not use heavily weighted flies) then pay attention to your presentation. Are you fishing the proper zone (depth) while dredging nymphs in heavier waters? Yes, you risk the hangups, break offs, lost flies/tippet and re-rigging. But, you also will catch more fish holding in tough lies. 

When I shorten my line, add weight and dredge in heavier waters my catch rate goes up dramatically compared to the longer line/leader set up and lighter offering. The fish are use to debris bouncing/swirling along the bottom. Often the pattern you are using is less important than the presentation. Also, enter Czech Nymphing in the Search Blog Archives search box, upper right for how to info Cz Nymphing, which is (regardless of pattern) a good, basic start to nymph with a shorter line. Wade carefully for safety and a stealth approach.

Oh, when you do hang up, don’t go reaming up on that rod like you are fishing with your old Bi Mart cheapo rod. You can give a sharp snap or two and if you are indeed hung up then pull the line straight until the setup either pulls free or you break off. Sometimes moving up stream a bit extricates the setup from beneath the rocks it wedged under. Check your line for abrasion and nicks too.

04
Jun
11

Fly Fishing: Tandem of Yellow Sally Nymph & Green Rockworm?

I recall last Summer having good success along the riffles of the McKenzie River while fishing separately a nymph (Large Hare’s Ear, size 8-10) and also a Green Rockworm Larva pattern. I am going to experiment in the months ahead with dredging a shorter line, while offering two flies at once through the riffles. I will probably stay with a larger, weighted, Gold Bead Head, Gold Ribbed, Hare’s Ear for the Yellow Sally Nymph (Family Perlodidae/Genus Isoperla) and a version of the Green Rockworm larva (Caddis, Genus Rhyacophila). The Jersey Angler provides a worthy pattern for the Green Rockworm and some good pictures of the larva and his pattern The Cooper Bug.

Employ the standard nymphing rig, cast/lob/sling with a more open loop to avoid tangles of two flies, strike indicator if you use one and split shot (that would be a mess wouldn’t it?). Certain Czech Nymphs would also provide excellent pattern options for the Green Rockworm Larva.

I suggest the two patterns in one offering because they inhabit the same waters and are equally vulnerable to drift and are active during the same span of Summer. If the two fly rig is two cumbersome then keep both insects in mind for subsurface presentations, and of course, watch for the activity on the surface as Caddis come off or the Yellow Sally comes off (if you research the literature re Yellow Sally’s ’emerging’ it is often said then crawl toward shore or up onto rocks to hatch as most Stoneflies do…. however, there are some members of the Yellow Sally that emerge out of the water like a Mayfly on the run…I witnessed this last year on the McKenzie River and commented re that back then). Regardless, have your Elk Hair Caddis and larger, cream colored wet fly or Stimulator like patterns available for surface activity too.

06
May
11

Fly Fishing: ‘Water Loading’ Heavy Nymphs & Sling

Stonefly Nymph Box (SwittersB)

Ah, May/June! Chasing the Salmon Fly and Golden Stone crawl outs and hatches. Fishing your nymphs on the bottom where they crawl toward shore or below the rapids, where they have been dislodged and been carried into slightly deeper water. It is a fun Western U.S. event and interesting to witness the actual emergence (crawling onto shore/emergence from the nymphal body).  

This action will carry on into July depending upon water temps. The California Stones (Salmon Fly) will end first and the Golden Stones will linger longer. It is a chuck it-sling it-stay tight to the fly-short line-drift affair. You can and probably should attach a second fly to the Stonefly (smaller nymph or a wet fly). Just remember, to avoid tangles, to think of your cast as a lob, open loop affair rather than trying to produce a standard cast with a tighter loop. Tangles and hooks into the back of the neck may result. Some will advocate throwing a longer line, and indeed sometimes you will have to chuck and duck and mend to get to a prime lie. But, I would advise the beginner to fish shorter and tighter to the fly with only  a mend or two at most.  Casting a heavy nymph by loading rod with water tension…

http://tongarirorivermotel.co.nz/2010/08/casting-tongariro-bombs/

23
Apr
11

Fly Tying: Underlying flash ribbing (Cz. Nymph)

Czech Mate Caddis Nymph (Orvis)

Czech Nymph

The above two Czech Nymphs are pretty much identical except for one small ribbing/flash detail you may want to incorporate….note the sub ribbing on the top pattern. It is often seen on many or the original Czech Nymphs. It is one of two ribbings, one flashier and one that goes over the top to tie down the back strap. The second rib, you will see is wrapped up between the underlying rib. Also, note with the top pattern there is an added factor, a tungsten bead, up in the thorax area, tucked amongst the dubbing. Two ways to tie much the same pattern, both fish catchers. Remember presentation of the fly is as important as the fly pattern. 

19
Apr
11

Fly Tying & Fly Fishing: “Must Have” Scuds

“Must have” patterns both annoy me, and as they should, simplify things. A ‘must have’ pattern can be a trap. Tie it on and go. A ‘must have’ pattern must work all the time, anywhere?

Such is the case with scuds. Most articles are like every one was originally issued a press release from the Fishing Guru 25 years ago and every writer feels obligated to issue the same chopped release/phrases for their region. It smacks of an obligatory inclusion on the last page of a book.

As with any outing, it is better to do some research first re a stream, lake, etc. before going blind. Research on line for info about hatches and when they most often appear (May to June; late afternoons; overcast days best). Also, how to fish them is critical. The presentation of the fly. How would the real ‘insect’ or critter act in the water?

You might be able to gather some meaningful info from your fly shop and a pattern or two to use.

Such is the case with scuds, the ‘must have’ pattern. You will find this must have pattern: drifted and jerked in rapids and riffles with a split shot 6″ above; also you will find it fished deep in stillwaters and the slower, backwaters of rivers beneath a strike indicator with no weight save the fly’s/hook’s weight.

The ‘must have’ scud seems capable of being in all waters and anywhere in those waters according to the varied articles and posts. As with many things for the beginning fly fisher/tier the signs of certainty and clarity are confusing re scuds once you read past ‘must have’.

I won’t propose to be an expert re scuds. I have fished them on tailwater fisheries and done well in quieter, weedy side waters drifting slowly near the bottom. In stillwaters in B.C. and near home, I have fished longer leaders on a floating line and let the fly sink down amongst the weeds and worked the pattern near the bottom, moving it in a slow jigging motion (and yes getting tangled, so a slip strike indicator may be in order…query upper right in search box re slip strike indicator).

I tied the patterns from size 18’s to size 10’s. I like Orange ( a common color for a dead or supposedly egg laden female), tan, and my favorite olive.. Some patterns can be tied with the traditional scud/Czech-Caddsi Pupa configuration as below here:

Both of the above patterns have the back strap of plastic material that is tied in at the bend with ribbing material (wire usually). The body material is either dubbed up the shank or wrapped up the shank (micro chenille and a sparse hackle wrap or two). Then the back strap is pulled over and secured at the eye with the ribbing following to hold the back strap in place. This tying sequence is used in one form or another for Czech, Polish, Caddis, Scud patterns. Large or small.

Another pattern, less sophisticated and still worthy is one I use for Scuds for sizes 10 to 14. I use an Estaz material that is a synthetic (plastic) chenille material. I tie on and wrap up and simply trim the top bristly material away and that is it. It is a great pattern. It can be slightly weighted. I don’t put on a bead, but you could for a Caddis Pupa pattern.

  So, to recap on ‘must have’ Scud’ pattern: research your waters you fish. Do they have scuds? Where are they likely to live in your waters? How would you present the pattern to best put it where they live and maybe move it to suggest life? How would I tie a pattern that looks close in size, color and movement to imitate the real life scud. Research Estaz as a fly tying material and look at the sizes. It is not the same as Sparkle Chenille.

Not to confuse matters more, for the heck of it do a little research on sow bugs as well as they are often linked to scuds (freshwater shrimp) in stream habitat. See if they reside in the same parts of the stream’s holding waters. Good luck and as usual have fun!     


17
Apr
11

Fly Tying: Stonefly (Time To Tie Stone’s)


There are the simpler Stonefly patterns: Bitch Creek, Montana Stone, Brooks’ Stone (look up on Google Images). Some 20+ years ago the Kaufmann Bro’s of Tigard, Oregon presented the Kaufmann Stonefly. It is still here, and more often than not, it now has rubber legs. The original blended dark dubs can be substituted with tans and golds for Golden Stones, Brown Stones (large and small). Always heavily weighted to dredge the depths (remember most Stoneflies crawl toward shore to emerge onto land at the pre-emerge phase at some point). Research the time of Spring-Summer for various Stonefly emergences.   

EARLY BLACK STONE (HIP WADER)                       KAUFMANN STONE’S

19
Mar
11

Fly Tying: Chunks and Dredgers

A ‘chunk’ on a hook. Heavily weighted hooks designed to dredge heavy currents alone or in tandem with another fly. Simple, scraggly dubbed Pupa patterns that you either better chuck/duck or sling out around you and not hit any one beside you.

The hook has a molded lead body on a large size 6 hook. This style hook from Jan Siman comes in smaller sizes also. Yes, you can get by with wrapping your own lead wire. The body was dubbed with a blend of rabbit/sparkle dubbing. The thorax was wrapped with a dubbing brush of deer hair. The hair was dyed in cinnamon, but I used a black permanent marker to darken the deer hair. A ‘chunk’ to dredge with. Not meant for quiet back waters; you’ll be hung up.


Greens, Tans, Black, Orange. Any number of colors work as the  fly tumbles the rapids, riffles and seams. Smaller versions will do well too.





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