Posts Tagged ‘Damsel flies

10
Apr
11

Stillwater Fly Fishing: Wind Drifting

One of my enjoyable memories on many B.C. lakes is fishing up against the wind (or, rowing, kicking in bigger winds) and turning and letting the wind blow me back down a selected area. I have frequently had a damsel or dragon nymph dragging along with the speed of the wind. Whamo more often than not. More than up against the wind. Sometimes this is a gentle drift and other times you have a precise route to cover in heavier winds. Once a slot is covered, you pull out of the ride and work back up to the top and do it again.

SO LOOKING FORWARD TO SUMMER!

12
Jan
11

Damsel Flies and Day Dreams (Waiting for the Thaw)

By no means is my weather comparable to what is pounding the East. It is 30 degrees out and my rig is encased in ice this morning, a by product of freezing rain and living close to Troutdale (Oregon) and the Gorge. Temps are promised to rise to the mid 40’s by 9am. Don’t think so, but sometime soon.

So, my mind wanders to a peaceful Summer afternoon on a lake, moving about the edges with Damsels flitting about. Warmth and fruitful calculations. Observations that can be worked upon. My recent chuck and chance it forays into the Spey world are more like casting with a hood on right now, so the day dream of warmth and certainty is appealing. Only five or so more months to go…….

Love the Damsel (TMuncy~SwittersB)

 

Damsels Delight Others Too (SwittersB)

03
Jul
10

Fly Fishing: Damsels Habits & Habitat

“They tend to creep around the bottom of ponds and streams searching for prey. When a nymph is about to molt into an adult it crawls out of the water. Dawn or dusk during fine weather is the most common times for molting. There are usually 10 – 15 molts as nymphs. It can take nymphs from 1 to 5 years to mature depending on species.

Before mating the male must transfer sperm from the genital opening on segment 9 to the reproductive organs on segments and 3. Then on finding a female he grabs her by the neck with his claspers. She curves her body around until the tip of her abdomen touches his reproductive organs in segment 2 and 3 to collect the sperm. This is known as the copulation wheel. After mating the pair may fly in tandem with the male leading. Females mate with more than one male and store the sperm from the matings, although she tends to use the sperm from the last mating. The male mating organ contains a structure that allows him to scrape or push aside the sperm from previous matings before depositing his own in the most favorable spot.”   Bumblebee

DAMSEL FLIES

Damsel's Delight



13
Feb
09

damsel flies (delicate amongst the reeds)

Damsel Adult by Seabrooke

Damsel Adult by Seabrooke

“Because they’re predatory, both damselflies and dragonflies have excellent eyesight. They have a pair of large compound eyes that are their primary means of detecting prey, but also several occelli across their “forehead” that they use for sensing small changes in light and dark, which helps them to orient upwards. The eyes are another useful feature to separate damsels from dragons – the compound eyes of the latter meet at the top of the head, while those of damselflies are usually widely separated. The eyes are also very important for avoiding predators.”

http://themarvelousinnature.wordpress.com/2008/06/22/emeralds-in-the-garden/

15
Jul
08

Damsel Adult (what the #%&^?)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damselfly

29
Jun
08

Damsel Fly Patterns (proven and experimental…copy them)

 

 

 

 

 

Can’t make this stuff up! Some things are better left unknown don’t you think? So, while this ugly predator (well, Lasiognathusamphirhamphus) fishes blind with the same old ‘fly, let me suggest you get ready for the damsel flies on your  favorite stillwaters. I have had great success with a couple of patterns that are simple to tie. The Georgi’s Damsel and Cope’s Damsel. (click on upper L pic and enlarge for nice details).

Georgi’s Damsel is a ginger colored damsel pattern. I ran into Georgi on Leighton Lake in BC. She and her husband, Neal, own the Logan Lake Flyshop in Logan Lake, BC just south of Leighton and Tunkwa lakes. She shared her pattern with me and represented this as an immature ‘instar’ of the damsel nymph explained to me the various stages of a damsel nymph’s development. Apparently go through a molting process and in the immature process they are sometimes a lighter color. The damsel nymph have gill like,  respirtory devices at the end of the abdomen. We would call this the tail for flytying purposes. Usually feather/hackle fibers or marabou are used for this portion the fly to suggest movement. Perhaps ostrich feathers of a smaller size would be good here for the breathing gills/’tail’. This has been a good little fly for me and I have left it as Georgi initially presented it.

The Cope’s Damsel is sleeker and more static in materials used, but this has been very productive from BC to Oregon. Fished toward the shoreline’s reeds or retrieved toward the shore (remember the damsels are slowly swimming beneath the surface toward objects to climb above the surface). This pattern was originated by Jim Cope. Remember Cope’s Callibaetis? I tie this in medium brown and green. Both are equally productive. The only thing I (well not the only thing, but I should say one thing) wonder is if the color for the immature nymph is of less value to you as the fish key on mature ’emerging’ nymph, which are probably darker (like Cope’s pattern).

I believe tying the Georgi’s in a variety of vegetation colors and the Cope’s to match that same camo theme will cover it all. Match the veg!  I have included other experimental patterns for damsels that work. The Georgi Damsel and the Cope’s Damsel as well as these other patterns work. I have tied patterns that combine both qualities of Georgi’s Damsel and the Cope’s. Some I have tied a bit too thick and may be better suited for small dragons. You’ve got the patterns, but pay attention to the presentation as well. Where do they live as a nymph at? What do they feed upon? How do they swim? How do they ‘hatch’?  Below are ‘spooning’ damsels. A Georgi Damsel and a Cope Damsel, but with a marabou tail. 

OK, I was so impatient to post today. I took these shots outside in morning light hence the shadows. I was too impatient to wait for the high noon as it is frigging hot outside and well as I said impatient.    

http://www.ariverneversleeps.com/showsell/ads/client15.html  (access to contact information for Georgi and Neal’s shop in Logan Lake, B.C……still don’t have a weblog/website!?!)  (July 2, 2008: per Georgi’s comments~See Comments Section for excellent advice~ their shop is no more…but, I am sure their positive spirit carries on. Her excellent fly carries on.  Thank you, Georgi and best wishes to you and Neil.    

https://swittersb.wordpress.com/2008/08/19/brian-okeefes-wisdom-positive-and-vital/ (worth reading for a view of the sport’s many faces)




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