Posts Tagged ‘damsel

18
Sep
15

Deer Damsel Fly Pattern

The Deer Damsel: I spun/dubbed a thorax collar of deer hair to represent legs. The rest of the pattern is the more traditional materials: stacked marabou tail and dubbed abdomen of hare’s ear with guard hairs.

08
Dec
14

Damsels to be distressed….

These are damsel fly patterns for stillwater (lake) fly fishing. I tied these four patterns (for the novice’s reference they are about an inch long) based on patterns I discovered back in 2008. They are variations of Jim Cope (Oregon) and Georgi Abbott (Logan Lake, B.C.) damsel patterns. The damsel patterns are highly effective on an intermediate or floating line worked around the edges of reeds and near the shoreline. The more static, slender Cope pattern or the fluffy, animated Georgi pattern never fail to produce in the fishy edges of a lake.

This shot was taken in full sunlight. I learned this six years ago when Tim Barker, over at Planet Trout (extraordinary site on not only fly tying & fly fishing but Hollywood history!) suggested photographing in direct sunlight.

stillwater damsels-fly tying-fly fishing-fly pattern-lakes-nymph

25
Nov
13

Photography: Diminutive Damsels

Damsel Collage 2

I was going to lead with Sexy Damsels, but opted for Diminutive. Both are probably too provocative for the perverts out there. I mean when I use Nymphs, I get all manner of visits from those less concerned with entomology and fly fishing and more with waif like female forms. Well, the Damselfly is worthy of fly porn representation because in its own right, it is enticing to Trout. Double Click on Image for better look at patterns.

The diminutive Damselfly is a staple enticer pattern for lakes/stillwaters. Fish it on an Intermediate or Floating line on a more horizontal plane. I recall reading long ago, somewhere, that a Damsel pattern should be fished either parallel to the shoreline or toward the shoreline. I have caught Trout all over lakes, in the upper strata, regardless of direction of retrieve, BUT I have had the most success closer to the shoreline/reeds/structure with short strips/figure 8 retrieves…slow and easy.

Tan, Brown, Olive, Lt. Green colors all produce. Wind drifting/pulling the fly behind on the shoals or retrieving by hand along the shoreline, the Damselfly patterns are an essential option for lakes. Research the life cycle of Damselflies and how they move when in the water. Adjust your visualization/retrieve accordingly.

19
May
12

The Damsel….On The Edge….And, The Lost Net

On a recent trip to a lake, the wind was relentless for hours on end. Anchoring up was the only option as kicking or rowing was too demanding and unproductive against the winds. So, I found a narrow strip of quiet water along a reed line near shore. And, here I caught fish and a net.

I anchored in this quiet strip along the reed line. In close to the reeds the water was maybe 3′ and as it moved out toward the black arrows it quickly dropped to 6 feet. Most of the fish were taken as the fly settled down the drop off rather up near the reeds. I wasn’t seeing any working fish near the surface.

I was using a Size 14 Georgi’s Damsel in a unique ginger color. I met Georgi Harley on a B.C. lake years ago and she introduced me to the ‘instar’ color option.

I worked the Damsel pattern parallel to the shore line. Not the optimum presentation path, but the best I could do under the circumstances. It was a successful plan. At one point, I caught something else though….a landing net.

I dredged this mucky mess up to my ‘toon’ and hoisted the smelly mess onto the apron. It was a perfect structure beneath the water for all manner of aquatic critters to find their little spot.

The picture really doesn’t do justice (sorry for the blurry focus) to the amount of activity that was taking place in the nooks and crevices of this lost landing net. Damsels, lots of grey-olive scuds and larva wiggling about. It was very revealing as to color and size of insects.

Once to shore, I took the landing net and hung it over a fence post. Someone, if not the original owner, will maybe cleanup it up and make use of it. Of particular interest was a discussion I had had with a man hunkered down in his truck waiting out the wind. He wondered aloud if there were scuds in the lake. I had no idea at the time. Now I do. Some stillwater fly fishers immediately put scuds at the top of their fly list. I have some mental block there and forget scuds. I really need to fix that oversight.

12
Feb
09

Thin Mint Woolly Bugger (along the weedlines and lily pads)

Thin Mint by G. Muncy

Thin Mint by G. Muncy

The Thin Mint has been around about five years in the NW. It is a smallish (size 10) woolly bugger with a multi-colored marabou tail and a touch of krystal flash, flashabou or some hint of light added to the tail (don’t over do it). The body is the irrepressible peacock…amazing material…ribbed and wrapped with brown hackle. It is topped off with a gold bead, although I have seen brass/copper also. This pattern could be tied in any size typical of a bugger. But, I have used  a size 10 on stillwaters with great success, when green is the ticket. This is probably the smallest Woolly Bugger that I tie. It seems most productive for me and my son, Tony (he uses it more than I do) in and around shoreline weeds. A good damsel pattern if not too heavy a bead, or perhaps a small dragon. It works. Alternatives could be to forgo the bead and go unweighted or a little bit of lead/tungsten wrapped on the shank (keep it equally balanced on the shank for a uniform/horizontal sink if fishing shallow waters with the pattern. So, there you have it: New Mexico, Wisconsin, Oregon and most likely many other points for the Thin Mint.     
Thin Mint by Andy K

Thin Mint by Andy K

Andy K wrote: ‘This fly won’t win any awards for originality, but it is my go to fly on a section of the Lower Tomorrow river that I enjoy fishing. It works elsewhere as well, but it’s THE first fly I grab for the Lower Tomorrow.’ (Think Freestone)

Thin Mint Wooley Bugger
Tied By
Andy_K
Hook: Daiichi 2220 #10
Thread: Black 6/0
Bead: Tungsten gold bead
Tail: Brown, olive and black marabou with Krystal Flash tied in on both sides
Body: Pearl Peacock Angel Hair dubbed
Hackle: Black variant saddle hackle

http://www.flyfishingwis.com/html/fly_swap_07.html

Thin Mint Bugger

Thin Mint Bugger

Hook: Daiichi 2220 #10
Thread: Black 6/0
Bead: Tungsten gold bead
Tail: Brown, olive and black marabou with Krystal Flash tied in on both sides
Body: Pearl Peacock Angel Hair dubbed
Hackle: Black variant saddle hackle

Tied by Jeremy Barela
Photo by Jeremy Barela

http://www.newmexicotrout.org/patterns_thin_mint_bugger.html

29
Jun
08

Damsel Fly Patterns (proven and experimental…copy them)

 

 

 

 

 

Can’t make this stuff up! Some things are better left unknown don’t you think? So, while this ugly predator (well, Lasiognathusamphirhamphus) fishes blind with the same old ‘fly, let me suggest you get ready for the damsel flies on your  favorite stillwaters. I have had great success with a couple of patterns that are simple to tie. The Georgi’s Damsel and Cope’s Damsel. (click on upper L pic and enlarge for nice details).

Georgi’s Damsel is a ginger colored damsel pattern. I ran into Georgi on Leighton Lake in BC. She and her husband, Neal, own the Logan Lake Flyshop in Logan Lake, BC just south of Leighton and Tunkwa lakes. She shared her pattern with me and represented this as an immature ‘instar’ of the damsel nymph explained to me the various stages of a damsel nymph’s development. Apparently go through a molting process and in the immature process they are sometimes a lighter color. The damsel nymph have gill like,  respirtory devices at the end of the abdomen. We would call this the tail for flytying purposes. Usually feather/hackle fibers or marabou are used for this portion the fly to suggest movement. Perhaps ostrich feathers of a smaller size would be good here for the breathing gills/’tail’. This has been a good little fly for me and I have left it as Georgi initially presented it.

The Cope’s Damsel is sleeker and more static in materials used, but this has been very productive from BC to Oregon. Fished toward the shoreline’s reeds or retrieved toward the shore (remember the damsels are slowly swimming beneath the surface toward objects to climb above the surface). This pattern was originated by Jim Cope. Remember Cope’s Callibaetis? I tie this in medium brown and green. Both are equally productive. The only thing I (well not the only thing, but I should say one thing) wonder is if the color for the immature nymph is of less value to you as the fish key on mature ’emerging’ nymph, which are probably darker (like Cope’s pattern).

I believe tying the Georgi’s in a variety of vegetation colors and the Cope’s to match that same camo theme will cover it all. Match the veg!  I have included other experimental patterns for damsels that work. The Georgi Damsel and the Cope’s Damsel as well as these other patterns work. I have tied patterns that combine both qualities of Georgi’s Damsel and the Cope’s. Some I have tied a bit too thick and may be better suited for small dragons. You’ve got the patterns, but pay attention to the presentation as well. Where do they live as a nymph at? What do they feed upon? How do they swim? How do they ‘hatch’?  Below are ‘spooning’ damsels. A Georgi Damsel and a Cope Damsel, but with a marabou tail. 

OK, I was so impatient to post today. I took these shots outside in morning light hence the shadows. I was too impatient to wait for the high noon as it is frigging hot outside and well as I said impatient.    

http://www.ariverneversleeps.com/showsell/ads/client15.html  (access to contact information for Georgi and Neal’s shop in Logan Lake, B.C……still don’t have a weblog/website!?!)  (July 2, 2008: per Georgi’s comments~See Comments Section for excellent advice~ their shop is no more…but, I am sure their positive spirit carries on. Her excellent fly carries on.  Thank you, Georgi and best wishes to you and Neil.    

https://swittersb.wordpress.com/2008/08/19/brian-okeefes-wisdom-positive-and-vital/ (worth reading for a view of the sport’s many faces)

16
Mar
08

Woolly Bugger (Leech or perhaps Dragon~Baitfish)

 

WB’s are tied and fished, whether intentionally or just kicking along, to be imitative of a leech and only indirectly a dragon nymph or damsel nymph or baitfish. If, as I wrote earlier, trout eat less leeches than we assume, then perhaps WB’s should be tied more often to simulate stout dragons or long dragons or slender damsels. Also, much can be done to imitate bait fish in appearance and presentation. 

 

 

 

11
Mar
08

Woolly Bugger’s

wooleybuggerolive.jpgsecretwoolybugger2.jpg

Speaking for myself, I have often instructed others, in the tying of W.B.’s that they most often suggest leeches and oh, also, maybe dragon nymph’s, baitfish, or damsel nymphs. Well, recently at a class taught by a very knowledgeable tyer and entomologist, he advised that in hundreds of lakes in worldwide travels and in the thousands of stomach samples he had taken, leeches made up an insignificant portion of trouts’ diets, even when there were heavy leech populations. Interestingly also, he said that the color is less critical than we fuss about so maybe a yellow bugger maybe just as effective as a typical black, brown, green bugger. I would hedge the bet here and have a variety of colors. I have had numerous instances in which green was it…not black or red or mottled brown. And, of course, I can recall instances of a different color being the go to color…so be prepared with colors, sizes, and varities of thickness/leanness. 

So, if that is the case, what is the reason for the success of a Wooly Bugger? The instructor, mentioned above, suggested it is the mere suggestiveness of the pattern that triggers the attack not the matching of any precise nymph. So, that being said, it is the presentation that is critical. In my teachings it should rarely be a chuck and wait presentation. Whether you are matching the hatch or searching with a suggestive/stimulating pattern, presentation should be the key. What are you suggesting and do you know how the critter you are imitating behaves underwater?

You will improve your success rate significantly on lakes by understanding presentation and visualizing the fly’s actions eight feet down and forty feet back. Also, use a clear/camo intermediate (Type I) line with a WF Floating and Type III-IV as available options.

I think if one is imitating damsels or dragons then the thickness of the body, density of the palmered hackle and the tail will be critical for the appearance/action and then, of course, the presentation and location will be important.    




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