Posts Tagged ‘dragon

01
Sep
15

Bug eyed…

dragon nymph pattern, macro, SwittersB

Beaded eyes on a dragon fly nymph pattern for stillwater (lakes) fly fishing

20
Nov
12

Fly Tying: Dragon Fly Pattern Options

There are reportedly 5800+ species of  Dragon flies on this planet. For fly fishing purposes, it can be simplified down to one simple concept (dare I say that) and that is re the shape of the nymph. Longer, sleeker or shorter, rounder. Both styles of nymphs are predatory and excellent patterns to deploy beneath the water’s surface particularly in lakes, or slower, backwaters of rivers. BC Info re Dragons

Wisconsin Water Monitoring Group Photo

06
Oct
12

Dragon Fly Fascination and Migration

As an avid fly fisher, particularly stillwaters, I have this frequently expressed fascination with Dragon Flies and Damsels….but, especially the Dragon. Probably it is the same for you, but these airborne critters alight upon my rod on a frequent basis. Mating in a sizzle-dizzle manner they land on my vessel like I am some dark alley outside of a bar (I made that up and am not sure where it came from). Dragon Flies are positive karma to me, even if not to their unfortunate prey.

I love fishing the ‘nymph’ or larva pattern and attempt to visualize it as a predatory killer, something the predatory Trout rarely fails to smack. So, I found a few interesting tidbits about adult dragons: did you know they (some of them) migrate South? Never considered that an option. They have been known to attack Hummingbirds! All this from these friendly visitors. Maybe I should be more concerned by these creatures:

“During all stages of their lives, dragonflies are fearsome and efficient hunters. If dragonfly larvae were eight to sixteen inches long, as they probably were 300 million years ago, we would dare not swim in fresh water for fear of being attacked.” (XX)

Applying Tracking Device (Christian Ziegler Photo)

16
Mar
08

Woolly Bugger (Leech or perhaps Dragon~Baitfish)

 

WB’s are tied and fished, whether intentionally or just kicking along, to be imitative of a leech and only indirectly a dragon nymph or damsel nymph or baitfish. If, as I wrote earlier, trout eat less leeches than we assume, then perhaps WB’s should be tied more often to simulate stout dragons or long dragons or slender damsels. Also, much can be done to imitate bait fish in appearance and presentation. 

 

 

 

11
Mar
08

Woolly Bugger’s

wooleybuggerolive.jpgsecretwoolybugger2.jpg

Speaking for myself, I have often instructed others, in the tying of W.B.’s that they most often suggest leeches and oh, also, maybe dragon nymph’s, baitfish, or damsel nymphs. Well, recently at a class taught by a very knowledgeable tyer and entomologist, he advised that in hundreds of lakes in worldwide travels and in the thousands of stomach samples he had taken, leeches made up an insignificant portion of trouts’ diets, even when there were heavy leech populations. Interestingly also, he said that the color is less critical than we fuss about so maybe a yellow bugger maybe just as effective as a typical black, brown, green bugger. I would hedge the bet here and have a variety of colors. I have had numerous instances in which green was it…not black or red or mottled brown. And, of course, I can recall instances of a different color being the go to color…so be prepared with colors, sizes, and varities of thickness/leanness. 

So, if that is the case, what is the reason for the success of a Wooly Bugger? The instructor, mentioned above, suggested it is the mere suggestiveness of the pattern that triggers the attack not the matching of any precise nymph. So, that being said, it is the presentation that is critical. In my teachings it should rarely be a chuck and wait presentation. Whether you are matching the hatch or searching with a suggestive/stimulating pattern, presentation should be the key. What are you suggesting and do you know how the critter you are imitating behaves underwater?

You will improve your success rate significantly on lakes by understanding presentation and visualizing the fly’s actions eight feet down and forty feet back. Also, use a clear/camo intermediate (Type I) line with a WF Floating and Type III-IV as available options.

I think if one is imitating damsels or dragons then the thickness of the body, density of the palmered hackle and the tail will be critical for the appearance/action and then, of course, the presentation and location will be important.    




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