Posts Tagged ‘emerger

31
Mar
16

Fly Pattern: Parachute Emerger

Parachute-Emerger-Mayfly-Fly Pattern-SwittersB

04
Feb
14

The Flymph: Not Quite Nymph…Almost Adult

A Flymph is a great fly pattern for the beginning tier and serviceable as a fishing pattern for all fly fishers. A combination of the nymph and what we now call the ’emerger’, it entices with movement and general shapes. It suits my ‘impressionistic’ almost, but not quite tying style (some might call it sloppy/lazy) and it is productive in streams and lakes. More here re flymphs

 

Flymph SwittersB-Here, I dubbed a tapered fly from the rear (abdomen) up into the thorax, creating a buggy/leggy/winged front end. Flymphs can be/maybe should be tied with a bit cleaner style with a clearly defined tail/abdomen (nymph like) and then a wet fly style thorax/head. Presentation, as always, is important. The wet fly swing or Leisenring lift (rising, emerging insect) are traditional presentation options for flymphs/soft hackles/wets. Here Oliver Edwards offers his suggestions that contradict the ‘swing’/down and across presentation. On lakes, I have simply cast to rising fish or used as a searching pattern with a straight forward cast it out and slowly work it back letting the fibers work their twitching magic. (Additional information)

02
Dec
13

Fly Tying & Fishing: Mathew’s X Caddis…Great Fly

In keeping with the smallish fly theme, I tied up these X-Wing Caddis flies (green bodied/deer hair wing) on size 18 hooks. Simple to tie, I actually have had wonderful success with this pattern with green trailing shuck/green body and amber trailing shuck/tan body. The trailing shuck is sometimes called a ‘tail’. Consider it (the Zelon fibers) to be the still attached nymphal body that the Caddis is attempting to separate from. Don’t tie it in too short or thick. I use a single strand of Krystal Flash for the ribbing. Deer hair for the wing (some use Yearling Elk Hair).

X Caddis Switters

X caddis SwittersB

Green X Caddis Emerger SwittersB

Excellent How To Video for Mathew’s X Caddis Fly Pattern

X Caddis Trout Early W SwittersB

16
Nov
13

Midge Emerger on a Kernel of Corn

No, I didn’t attempt to photograph this Midge Emerger setting atop a kernel of corn. But, for the uninitiated to fly tying, hook/pattern size it is helpful to imagine that kernel of unpopped corn and imagine the pattern in the picture as roughly the same size…or a little longer and fatter than a piece of cooked rice. The curved, light wired, pupa hook affords a slightly wider hook gape to hopefully facilitate the hook up with such small flies. Annoying to tie, necessary to have.

22 Midge emerger SwittersB

15
Nov
13

Photography: Macro Puzzles

I struggle for consistency with my macro photography. Sometimes it is there and other times it just isn’t. Today, I wanted to photograph a small (size 16) emerger pattern I simply call a ‘Puff’ given the wing material is called a CDC Puff Feather. I tried to present a contrast to the flies size by shooting it in front of a U.S. Quarter for a point of reference. The flash was dialed way down. Yet it still washed out. You still get an idea but not as crisply as I would have hoped. The beauty of the macro lens or magnifying goggles is one can readily see the faults of one’s tying (sloppy thread head/cut starling hackle for example).

camera fly quarter SB puff quarter vise SB

sb cdc puff

09
Nov
13

Fly Tying: Light Wire Emerger Hooks

The newer (last several years) light wire, curved shanked hooks have facilitated more realistic patterns. At first they were a uniformly curved shank hook, sometimes also called a pupa or scud hook. Now there are many more variations of the curved shank, all designed to float the thorax portion of the pattern in the film, and dip the abdomen into the film and below…like an emerging mayfly attempting to break free.

xDA1167 Daiichi Klinkhammer hook anglers workshop

emerger dry fly SBxsnowshoe-emerger-swittersb

29
May
13

Fly Tying: Sparse Emerger

Sparse Emerger SB

16
Dec
12

Fly tying the emerger pattern (visualize)

The fly fisher fishes top to bottom and strategizes on what food sources are in the water and what the fish might want to eat. Part of this enjoyable game is tying (or buying) the fly that represents a stage of life in that watery world and presenting it to entice. It is helpful to visualize your offering as it entices…such is the ’emerger’ fly pattern. The pattern can be just below the water’s surface or hanging in the film (half in/half out) preparing to emerge or perhaps stuck in the process (stillborn) and highly vulnerable. I offer up three photos: The first one, I apologize because, I cannot source it (perhaps someone will note and comment) and the other is a pattern I tied of an emerger pattern.

emerger dry fly source unksnowshoe-emerger-swittersbThe ’emerger’ pattern is most often depicted in this manner. However, an unweighted nymph, or an nymph pattern with a tuft of something protruding from the wingcase can be fished just below the surface as an ’emerger’ with great effectiveness too. Query Google Images “emerging nymphs” and you can see numerous patterns. Ignore the freaky women ’emerging’ as nymphs from the water shots. 

quill_gordon_emerg_nymph-531x396

Emerging Nymph: flyfishingsmokymountains.com

mayfly-emerger ian martin

Floating Nymph-Emerger by Ian Martin

05
Nov
12

Wet Palm

For the non-tying, non-fly fisher, the flies shown are generally called a ‘wet fly’ and presented subsurface from just below the water’s surface and deeper. For the tier…these were tied on a size 14 stout hook, but the body was reduced in size for a smaller fly on a bigger hook. The ribbing should have been a bit finer in thickness, but the segmentation does pop with the lighter colored ribbing. How does my life line look?

16
Sep
12

Season’s End?: Recap the Forgottens

With the best of intentions last Winter, I tied up these Quill bodied, Parachute Emergers (about a dozen) and then put them in a little tin box and set them aside. Today, while sorting through my fly boxes, I found the little tin box beneath some bags of fly tying materials. 

Now fishing has been scarce of late. But, what was my plan for this little gem? Did I just tie to practice using quills or contending with that parachute post and wound hackle? I usually tie more for a purpose and less to perfect techniques. If I was to again teach fly tying, I would be perfecting some techniques that I have let languish. 

So, on closer inspection of this little gem…I really had no plan for it. I just tied up some and promptly tucked them away into lonely fly pattern oblivion.

A strategy, a plan, an awareness of why you tie certain patterns and when they would be of use helps one grow as a fly fisher chasing trout or whatever species. As Summer draws to an end, I will do some lake fishing, chase some Silvers, Late Summer Steelhead, trout feeding on eggs below Chinook redds and I seriously doubt the little gem above will be used for any trout fishing until next year. So now might be a good time to research what I had in mind for this fly back last Winter when I tied them. Then I should put them in fly boxes that make them visible and viable. Better planning and management of fly boxes. What can be so hard managing a gazillion flies?




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