Posts Tagged ‘fly casting tips



11
Jun
11

Fly Fishing: Knots Landing

One of the basics of fishing how to’s are knots; the how to tie a certain knot. For the average, beginning fly fisher, fishing freshwater, there are only a few knots to learn. Most beginning books, classes, blogs (to include this one…see search box re “knots”) for fly fishing, have plenty of info on how to tie a cinch/clinch knot, surgeon’s knot, blood knot, nail knot, loop knot. 

The problem I encounter on the water with beginners, is they look past the importance of a maintained uniformly tapered leader/tippet. The proper leader is important in turning over the fly via the cast. It is important in the presentation of a soft delivery to not spook the fish. 

A knot that joins butt section to leader or leader to tippet should not look like a granny knot on steriods. Keep the knots lean and horizontal, not round, irregular and clunky. Knots create drag, so pay attention to this important, basic skill. Understand how to tie/construct/maintain a reasonably tapered leader of around the length of your rod if not more. Strive to maintain that butt section/leader length and only have to touch up the tippet length now and then after break offs or repeated changing of flies.  Presentation of the line, leader, tippet, fly includes a streamlined, properly tied knot. 

21
May
11

Fly Fishing: the Shoreline Eddy

I was going to write the ‘back eddy’ but I think it is better to describe it as the shoreline eddy. The fly fishing literature will usually suggest the eddy is a ‘smorgasbord’ of food for trout (when did you last lay eyes on a smorgasbord?). Most eddy’s are the size of your car or smaller, with the occasional mega one. A shoreline projection into the current or bend in the river will create the eddy. Regardless of their size, food (insects) is funneled into these revolving, carousel like pools. The eddy, at some point, because it is rotating, doubles back up river against the normal downstream flow. The trapped food items are vulnerable to a trout, and your approach, if not stealthy, makes you vulnerable to a fish’s view. So, plenty of fish food and fish is exciting. But, the challenge will be the presentation. A dry, an emerger, a streamer drawn through hoping for that hit? 

This is one of those times you really should slow down with your approach (it is always said you should slow down, but often we fail to stop and study the water from the edge out). Once you spot the eddy, stop. Get a clear view. Can you back off and observe for a while? The fish will be sipping or right below the surface taking in the trapped insects. Think how you are going to present a fly into that slowly revolving window without spooking the fish. A long leader is ideal for a probably small offering. If possible and safe, can you climb above the eddy and safely, stealthily look down to study the activity?

How will you present the fly while staying low, watching your fly, dealing with possible wind, and avoiding too much drag? You will not get too many chances here so take your time to watch how the fish are/is feeding. Then consider your cast, where the fly will travel given the current and where the fish is in relation to that path. Don’t just chuck and chance it. 

Do a little research on Pale Morning Duns, a Summer time pattern that likes the quieter back waters, particularly a shoreline eddy.


18
May
11

Fly Fishing: Introducing to Kids

Kell & Katie (SwittersB)

I have written here before re my own transgressions in teaching my sons how to fly fish. Just a friendly reminder to make it a relaxed, initially simple outing. Do not bring your own competitive, impatient style to the water. Be patient with the child’s own impatience and competitive streak. Teach them, mentor them with an eye toward the realities of the sport: things do not always go as planned or desired. Tangles, snags, collapsed casts are all to be expected and fixed. Like in life……..

If you are teaching your own acquaintances, then remember they will be watching your style and how you handle all manner of problems and successes. We do tend to be on our good behavior while teaching strangers, but less so around our own family.

Children will bring to the table all manner of emotions they have developed through sports or self -imposed assessments. Don’t add to their load with too much negativity or too much “here let me show you”. Keep it simple and fun. 

Pick a quiet expanse of lawn at a park or school. Starting at the edge of a stream can be ok, but back casts, mending, roll casts etc. will require patience. At the end of a session, you will know if the child is relaxed, happy, excited or handing that rod to you like it is charged with bad ju ju.

Once you think they have a simple grasp of the basics, a casting class or beginner’s class may be in order, but make sure they are up to it and that you have a sense if the instructor is up to teaching kids. Watch for kid’s classes or introduction to fly fishing casting ponds at sportsmen’s shows /expositions.

Above everything, make it something they will want to still be doing for the rest of their life. Check out FlyFishingPhil for a casting technique drill to adapt to teaching young ones:

http://www.ffpc-rods.com/page18.html

15
May
11

Fly Fishing: Fish Cone of View (Presentation Awareness)

FLY FISHING DEVON: HOW DO TROUT SEE TO EAT SURFACE FLIES 

This is one of the more intriguing parts of dry fly fishing and how to approach rising fish. The cone of view is not just relevant to how the fish sees the fly/insect, but also how that fish can see you, your rod and zipping line at times.  The deeper the fish is the bigger the cone of view to the surface and to the sides (consider your rod tip and upper body as potentially visible). This is why you will see fly fishers often depicted as crouching stream/lake side to avoid detection via their movements.  Truly, the beginner will learn over time as fish are spooked. Eventually, a holding/cruising fish will challenge you to slow down, reconsider your presentation and hold your breath.

Cone of View/Window @ TalkFlyFishing


06
May
11

Fly Fishing: ‘Water Loading’ Heavy Nymphs & Sling

Stonefly Nymph Box (SwittersB)

Ah, May/June! Chasing the Salmon Fly and Golden Stone crawl outs and hatches. Fishing your nymphs on the bottom where they crawl toward shore or below the rapids, where they have been dislodged and been carried into slightly deeper water. It is a fun Western U.S. event and interesting to witness the actual emergence (crawling onto shore/emergence from the nymphal body).  

This action will carry on into July depending upon water temps. The California Stones (Salmon Fly) will end first and the Golden Stones will linger longer. It is a chuck it-sling it-stay tight to the fly-short line-drift affair. You can and probably should attach a second fly to the Stonefly (smaller nymph or a wet fly). Just remember, to avoid tangles, to think of your cast as a lob, open loop affair rather than trying to produce a standard cast with a tighter loop. Tangles and hooks into the back of the neck may result. Some will advocate throwing a longer line, and indeed sometimes you will have to chuck and duck and mend to get to a prime lie. But, I would advise the beginner to fish shorter and tighter to the fly with only  a mend or two at most.  Casting a heavy nymph by loading rod with water tension…

http://tongarirorivermotel.co.nz/2010/08/casting-tongariro-bombs/

22
Apr
11

Fly Fishing Streamers: Adjustments in Order

Artwork by Blanca Pistillo

A few days ago, I was watching a man work a run outside of Eugene. He was working a nice little tube fly across and letting it swing through a nice seam. He was fishing for Steelhead. Obviously very eager for the vanguards of the Summer run.

About him, Caddis and a few Mayflies flitted about. More telling were the dozens of birds swooping right above the surface, dining upon the emerging insects. My immediate impulse, like most of us looking for indicators, would have been to put on a dry or emerger. And, minus the birds, I would have been nymphing. I have remarked about my mental block re streamer patterns. It almost never occurs to me, on an Oregon river, to fish a streamer (some how, it does for Browns on a lake). I have noticed the Sculpins scurrying about the rocks as I wade a river, and I did previously vow to tie more Sculpin patterns and to fish them this coming year (I need to get busy) .

Recently, on a FF discussion group, there was a decidedly pro swing the streamer contingent discussing the merits of the streamer and how some local shops downplay the worthiness of the patterns. So, this is a renewed vow to think broader….use more streamers (I know this sounds silly/elementary to many anglers about the world, who routinely swing streamers).

So for the beginning fly fisher this is a reminder to carry an assortment of streamer patterns to represent the baitfish of your regions rivers and lakes. There is a whole dimension re streamer fishing that is much like traditional Steelhead (or Pike) fishing. 

I won’t reinvent the wheel here. There are several good posts, on-line, regard (‘streamer pattern tactics’) on where to cast a streamer…how to retrieve the streamer…what type of fly line to use (floating, sink tips, clear intermediates)…what patterns to use…how to tie streamer patterns. My intent here is to say…’remember the streamer’!

Spruce Fly by SwittersB



06
Feb
11

Spey Casting: Followup Homework

I spent the better part of the day on the Sandy River fishing for steelhead. No pulls, but I had a good day. I found a very nice drift. I fished reasonably well and had the luxury of no one pushing me downstream. I got to practice, visualize (remember the post re Mike Kinney and his excellent word pictures?) and correct. At the end of the day, maybe two thirds of the casts really laid out nicely, but my attitude was such that there was no pressure, just a relaxed time on the water with beautiful conditions.

Snap T, or was it a Snap C?

But, I decided to do some followup studying when I got home and try to figure out why my Snap T’s or Z’s..er C’s petered out and caused my fly to unerringly wrap around the end of my rod. I need visuals. I came across a site by Alastair Gowans @ LetsFlyFish. It has some nice basic visuals re some of the Skagit casts as well as other types of fly fishing casts. I also need to pull out Ed Wards Skagit Master DVD and review while today’s fishing is fresh on the mind. I am building the imprint. Got home for last half of the Super Bowl and then it started pouring outside. The day was perfect. (Ok, upon further review, I am not bringing my rod back down river after the snap, but rather stopping as shown in pic, which leaves it open to tangles)





Below @ “The Past” you can search back to 2008 month by month

February 2020
M T W T F S S
« Jan    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
242526272829  

Please visit MUNCY DESIGNS (click)

Welcome to SwittersB & Exploring. Please Share, Comment & Like Away!

Please subscribe just below. Use the Search box to search topics.

Enter your email address to subscribe to the SwittersB blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 4,119 other followers

The Past

231!!! Countries Visiting SwittersB~Thank You!!!

free counters

Blog Stats: There are lies, damn lies and statistics

  • 4,783,121 Visits/Views (WP Original Stat~Pre Flag Counter Stats)

%d bloggers like this: