Posts Tagged ‘Fly Fish Presentation

23
Mar
12

Fishing Streamers & Wets: More than swinging across stream

Dry Flies, Nymphs, Streamers and Wets (forget the eggs, worms, terrestrials and mouse patterns for now). As a beginning fly fisher, I would suggest the inclusion of a few wet flies and streamers in your arsenal. And, as you hone those skills on a drag free drift for the dry and watching for the strike indicator/sighter to dip for the nymphs, don’t forget to learn how to present a wet fly (it is more than just down and across swings) and the streamer.

Slow your presentations down to move with the current speeds and dissect the holding lies to move the fly via mends into prime holding spots. Simply swinging the wet or streamer through a stretch of water will catch some fish, but you will up your odds if you guide the fly’s path through the water. Learning to correctly present these two pattern styles can also greatly enhance anyone’s efforts to learn traditional fly fishing for steelhead or salmon too. 

06
Mar
12

Kayak Fly Fishing & Nancie Battaglia’s Kayak Orgy

Photograph by Nancie Battaglia of the 1,925 kayaks and small boats that were combined as a record setting tribute/fundraiser to the Susan G. Komen Foundation. A Guiness World Record, Inlet’s giant raft, which took about two hours to form, also had the purpose of raising money for breast cancer research (a charity called Susan G. Komen for the Cure)

As a related topic, how about not only clustering together for an awesome shot, but individually plying the waters in a kayak and fishing. Ken Morrow at Fish Camp Rehab and Ken Morrow Outdoors writes about fishing from the kayak and other small vessels. Check out Ken’s two sites and study up on fishing from that skinny craft as well as fishing with physical limitations. I had seen Ken’s site this morning and later, while at the doctor’s office, I saw the cool shot by Nancie Battaglia. Imperfect pairing  but you get the idea.

01
Mar
12

Fly Tying: Green Caddis Larva in the Riffles

Green Rock Worm: Genus Rhyacophila

Green Caddis Larva: Genus Hydropsyche

Fast water nymphing in and beside that riffly water and just below. Some say first light and last light are the times best for dredging a larva pattern. Perhaps, but I have done well with greenish larva patterns midday as well. 

High Stick Nymphing The Riffles with Kelly Galloup

26
Jan
12

Fly Fishing: Small Sticks on Cricks

Several times a year, I find myself up logging roads toward upper drainages/tributaries of big rivers. I string up the 9′ to 9’6″ rod and set forth weaving my way, this way and that way, through the trees toward the waters edge. Once on the water, I scout the canopy and other over hanging growth to not only avoid hanging up the fly + tippet, but also to avoid smacking the rod tip.

The confines of a small stream quickly reveal the tangled web we weave when at first we use too big a stick on a small stream. Recently, I was privileged to review some DVD’s by Ed Herbst and in those DVD’s I noticed he was wielding short rods on narrow streams. He moved with ease, in stealth mode, and waved the little wand to delicately present his flies.

Now, this initially contradicts my impulse toward bigger waters, longer rods and more power. I have those rods and love them. But, those small streams are another enviro that beg the small stick. So, I invested in a couple Loomis rods, both 3 weights and shorter (7′ and 8′). For the last few years, I have used a 3 wt. (9′ St. Croix Legend) more and have handled some substantial trout on the 3 wt. These shorter rods have a softer, medium action and will most probably meet few fish beyond 14″….more like 6″ to 10″. If I do connect to a larger fish, it will be an epic story.

These are not rods for big rivers and big fish, which to my thinking would be potentially irresponsible if I am seeking a humane catch and release. These are sticks for little streams, the intimate confines and small flies. I am excited to use these on those private little escapes. Some of my best life time memories while fly fishing were on small streams.

25
Jan
12

Marble Trout of Slovenia & The Adriatic

There is, for me, a decided uniqueness to the Fly Tying and Fly Fishing of SE Europe. One part of that uniqueness is the available Marble Trout of Slovenia. A cousin of the Brown Trout, the fish reaches large size and lives in some of the most pristine rivers, which pour into the Adriatic Sea.

A Marble Trout from Josko.Org

Take a few minutes to study up on this unique fishery and the beauty of the region at JOSKO.ORG and at Fish & Fly. I think big flies (streamers, big stones and large morsels are in order)

“If you spend every day on the water casting tiny dry flies, you might have a lot of action but your chances of hooking a trout of a lifetime are slim to none. Monster marble trout eat sculpins, crayfish, big stoneflies and most of the time small grayling.” Fish&Fly

The Marble Trout is present in several countries bordering the Adriatic Sea, but Slovenia claims the fish as theirs. High in the mountains in the Soca and Idrijca Rivers the Marble Trout return.

 

17
Jan
12

Fly Tying: Less is More? OMG! I forgot I had that……

This Midge Pattern is tied sparse and lively. One turn of hackle, an extended dubbed body and a few strands of trailing shuck. It would ride low and have considerable movement. Size 20

This Midge pattern has the same trailing shuck material, a dyed peacock herl abdomen, a touch of dubbing for the thorax, and a CDC wing faced with one turn of Starling. It is tied medium bodied. Size 18

This pattern is fully, maybe even over, dressed and better suited for the edges of riffles and seams. Midges prefer the slower glides of tailouts and silty bottoms. The same trailing shuck material is perhaps over done. The abdomen of herl is obscured by the dubbed collar of Snow Shoe Rabbit fur. I would still fish it with confidence. To the eye, on a size 20 hook, it looks tiny and white.

I am not going to write any thing too profound here. Conditions (type of insects, location of feeding, how the fish are feeding) often dictate the pattern selection. I offer up these patterns as experiments in the early tying season. I was experimenting, and as I often do, just having fun with the materials.

I love finding a plastic bag, opening it to find materials I purchased and forgot about…”Yeehaw! I forgot about that stuff”. I loaded up on some cool stuff last year. The task now is to stay on task and tie more than a couple of each pattern before jumping to the next pattern…like a fart in a windstorm.

I still have to tie several dozen unweighted, earth tone Woolly Buggers to compliment the weighted ones. How boring a prospect is that…of course, until this Spring when I am fishing the shoals with those slower sinking morsels.

15
Jan
12

Stillwater Presentations: ‘Keep your tip down’

If I had a buck for every time I’ve cautioned….  Well maybe not that many times, but it is important to your stillwater presentation to keep the tip of your rod down toward the surface. Less slack is imparted to the fly line (above, there is a fair amount of slack to take up in a strip set or by swing the rod to the side to set the hook) if the tip is down to, or even in the surface (Intermediate /Sinking lines). 

If you cannot pick out your fly in the distance, then focus on where the line enters the water and watch for the line’s bow or sag to tighten or jerk away. On smoother waters you can see ripples or pulses jolt out from the sides of the fly line indicating a take. All this is easier to maintain if you just ‘keep your tip down!’ Geeze that lake looks inviting about now.




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