Posts Tagged ‘Fly Fishing Literature/Books

17
Feb
12

Imagine My Surprise: Hunting Trout by Tom Sutcliffe

I had recently heard from Ed Herbst that I might receive a generous offering from Tom Sutcliffe. In fact today, I did receive a package from South Africa and inside was an aut0graphed edition from Tom, complete with a nice handrawn Adam Dry Fly on the inside page. This personalized presentation is available to you by ordering directly from Tom Sutcliffe.

This past year, I have been most fortunate to receive inspiration from the works of Tom Sutcliffe, Ed Herbst, Tim Rolston and Craig Thom, all of the Republic of South Africa. All these gentlemen are well read in the history of fly fishing and tying, well beyond today’s contemporary offerings. I am quite thankful for their generosity and look forward to reading Tom’s fine book, Hunting Trout. Thank you Tom.

04
Sep
11

John Gierach and Tom Chandler Interview

Gierach & Chandler: I really liked reading this interview. Often you read a blog post and take away one or two enjoyable nuggets of information or inspiration…the nature of blog posts/time restraints, life!, I think. But, this interview was enjoyable on several levels, for me..  TU Gierach-Chandler    Revealing, honest, clarifying. 

01
Jul
11

Bloodknot Magazine & SwittersB

Bloodknot Magazine and me  

Thank you Bloodknot Mag….

19
Apr
11

Fly Tying & Fly Fishing: “Must Have” Scuds

“Must have” patterns both annoy me, and as they should, simplify things. A ‘must have’ pattern can be a trap. Tie it on and go. A ‘must have’ pattern must work all the time, anywhere?

Such is the case with scuds. Most articles are like every one was originally issued a press release from the Fishing Guru 25 years ago and every writer feels obligated to issue the same chopped release/phrases for their region. It smacks of an obligatory inclusion on the last page of a book.

As with any outing, it is better to do some research first re a stream, lake, etc. before going blind. Research on line for info about hatches and when they most often appear (May to June; late afternoons; overcast days best). Also, how to fish them is critical. The presentation of the fly. How would the real ‘insect’ or critter act in the water?

You might be able to gather some meaningful info from your fly shop and a pattern or two to use.

Such is the case with scuds, the ‘must have’ pattern. You will find this must have pattern: drifted and jerked in rapids and riffles with a split shot 6″ above; also you will find it fished deep in stillwaters and the slower, backwaters of rivers beneath a strike indicator with no weight save the fly’s/hook’s weight.

The ‘must have’ scud seems capable of being in all waters and anywhere in those waters according to the varied articles and posts. As with many things for the beginning fly fisher/tier the signs of certainty and clarity are confusing re scuds once you read past ‘must have’.

I won’t propose to be an expert re scuds. I have fished them on tailwater fisheries and done well in quieter, weedy side waters drifting slowly near the bottom. In stillwaters in B.C. and near home, I have fished longer leaders on a floating line and let the fly sink down amongst the weeds and worked the pattern near the bottom, moving it in a slow jigging motion (and yes getting tangled, so a slip strike indicator may be in order…query upper right in search box re slip strike indicator).

I tied the patterns from size 18’s to size 10’s. I like Orange ( a common color for a dead or supposedly egg laden female), tan, and my favorite olive.. Some patterns can be tied with the traditional scud/Czech-Caddsi Pupa configuration as below here:

Both of the above patterns have the back strap of plastic material that is tied in at the bend with ribbing material (wire usually). The body material is either dubbed up the shank or wrapped up the shank (micro chenille and a sparse hackle wrap or two). Then the back strap is pulled over and secured at the eye with the ribbing following to hold the back strap in place. This tying sequence is used in one form or another for Czech, Polish, Caddis, Scud patterns. Large or small.

Another pattern, less sophisticated and still worthy is one I use for Scuds for sizes 10 to 14. I use an Estaz material that is a synthetic (plastic) chenille material. I tie on and wrap up and simply trim the top bristly material away and that is it. It is a great pattern. It can be slightly weighted. I don’t put on a bead, but you could for a Caddis Pupa pattern.

  So, to recap on ‘must have’ Scud’ pattern: research your waters you fish. Do they have scuds? Where are they likely to live in your waters? How would you present the pattern to best put it where they live and maybe move it to suggest life? How would I tie a pattern that looks close in size, color and movement to imitate the real life scud. Research Estaz as a fly tying material and look at the sizes. It is not the same as Sparkle Chenille.

Not to confuse matters more, for the heck of it do a little research on sow bugs as well as they are often linked to scuds (freshwater shrimp) in stream habitat. See if they reside in the same parts of the stream’s holding waters. Good luck and as usual have fun!     


06
Apr
11

Fly Tying & Fishing Instruction

I was stuck in beautiful Eugene, Oregon and ended up in a Borders book store. There were, surprisingly, a scant dozen or so books of fishing. Surprising because Eugene sets amongst several excellent fishing venues within minutes of town.


I came upon a nice book by John Barr entitled Barr Flies. It is a glossy, large sized book with great visuals and a bit spendy. I liked the S-B-S tutorials on several nymph patterns and  I bought the book. I couldn’t fish, so I perused the Barr book and planned my tying to incorporate some of Barr’s patterns.

Another excellent book is Rick Hafele’s Nymph Fishing Rivers & Streams. Hafele provides a gazillion interesting facts about insects that trout eat and how to fish them.



31
Mar
11

Fly Fishing & The Bugs (Bug Water)

This fine book by Arlen Thomason has been out for awhile and already reviewed by many. I came across it at the Back Country Fly Shop in Corvallis, Oregon. I can only say what everyone else has said: fabulous, amazing details, painstaking photography, new understandings, great effort, well done. I have really enjoyed this book! Buy it.

Also, as a fellow Oregonian, I like the fact that Thomason lives by the McKenzie River in Walterville, Oregon. Don’t you wonder, when you hear those town names, who Walter was?

“Walterville post office was established in 1875 and named by the first postmaster and prominent Central Oregon rancher, George Millican, for his son Walter”    Wiki

13
Mar
11

Fly Tying Expo’s (Some Thoughts For the Beginner)

First and foremost, I appreciate every tying expo I have been to. I spent a few years driving my son, Tony, to them when he was the obligatory youth tier (albeit a darn good tier). So, I appreciate the mental~practical preparation involved.

As a beginning fly tier, I encourage you to attend these shows and most importantly do not be shy. I normally walk in and walk the circuit making a quick assessment of types of flies being tied. Now some would say not to eliminate any style of tie. Your choice. I look for the type of flies I will most often fish and want to learn more about. So, I look for trout flies and steelhead tube flies. You may look for bass flies and Atlantic Salmon artists, or Realistic Fly Designers (my designations).

As I said, do not be shy. You are there to learn. They are there to teach, clarify and inspire. If a chair is open sit down or get close. They aren’t selling anything so don’t walk on by. Take notes. Take their cards for later study or commercial contacts. If a tier is busy gabbing with friends or telling stories and not tying move on. Keep looking for the type of flies you are most interested in.

Ask ‘how to’ questions: ‘can you do that whip finisher move a bit slower?’ ‘what kind of feather is that?’ Some tiers are tying to knowledgeable tiers and may whiz by stages, so feel free to ask questions. It is a very open venue….or should be. The NW Fly Tying Expo in Albany, Oregon, I just went to, was a perfect match for most of my interests. Maybe a bass fly fisher would say different, I don’t know.

Another thing I noticed, and liked, the tiers run the gamut of human nature: the tiers were in various ways precise, scattered, anal, disorganized, gregarious, shy, gruff…the full range. They tied great flies and with all the varieties of styles, personalities and patterns. I think you will enjoy these shows and as I did take away tips and techniques I had forgotten or never seen before. Thanks to those that organize these shows and the tiers (and, vendors).

“You take 186 tyers, plus 160 volunteers,” Sherry Steele said. “And to have that many people step up to the plate, that’s really great. It’s huge.”    Statesman Journal




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