Posts Tagged ‘fly patterns

04
Jun
17

the lakes beckon…

A stillwater (lake) fly box filled & temporarily organized 😄 with mostly subsurface fly patterns. Of course, I have quite a few more fly boxes filled with surface patterns, emerger patterns etc. etc. Good luck and tight lines to all of you that wet a line now and then.

fly fishing-stillwater-fly box-SwittersB

22
Dec
16

buggy & suggestive…

nymphs-fly-tying-swittersb

12
Sep
16

planning & anticipation…

Late Summer fly fishing…pleasant daytime temps and cool mornings.

stillwater-flies-trout-swittersb

Big, beautiful fish caught, carefully photo’d and released.

30
Apr
15

Almost time…

the stonefly beckons

fly anglers on tumbling rivers

trout seek the morsels

golden-stonefly-nymph-SwittersB-Deschutes

General info re Stoneflies at Troutnut.com

06
Oct
14

Creationist & Fish

midge pupa-chironomid-SwittersB-macro-photography

A pleasing component of fly fishing is tying your own fly patterns. It is a past time that allows for varying degrees of artistic flare. It requires one to study insects and their behavior, to study the traditions of fly patterns around the world, to study the behavior of fish that consume insects, invertebrates, critters and other fish, to study the habitat, in which, fish and their food reside.

Yes you can just order flies on line or buy some at the local fly shop or big box sporting goods store. However, you might want to enhance your fly fishing experience by taking fly tying lessons and then improving your new skills with online research. There is something, after decades of tying, that gives me great pleasure to seduce a fish to a fly I tied and then to release that fish to safety (anti Catch & Release? Get over it!).

Fall is the time many fly shops and community colleges offer fly tying lessons. The lessons are usually offered in reasonably priced allotments for beginners. This is a nice gift for someone to give the fly fisher. Classes are often provided through Winter into Spring. Consider it. Create your own flies that either match traditional patterns or create your own magical experiment.

trout-fly fishing-SwittersB-photography

16
Apr
14

Photography: the scale of early season fly tying

photography-scale-fly patterns-penny-SwittersB~

photography-fly tying-macro-nymphs-SwittersB

09
Mar
14

Sly Fishing: Presentation

“Sly Fishing” I like that. I didn’t ‘coin’ the phrase, but it works for today’s post. There are many competing concepts in fishing and fly fishing in particular: matching the hatch, proper gear, the appropriate realistic fly pattern, timing, weather, lighting, location, reading the water and finally presentation, which in some ways combines much of the above considerations.

photography-fly tying-sparse-pattern-macro-swittersbSometimes the above images are insulting, challenging to fly fishers and tiers. Such simplicity flies in the face of the necessarily complex make up of fly fishing. I suppose, at times, there are required, exacting patterns that must be used on well bred, snobby, elitist fish. But, come on now, you know it is true….often simple patterns, sparse patterns are quite effective. It is the presentation and location of the offering that are often more important than some exacting pattern. 

I like to tie overdressed concoctions as much as the next tier. But, I annually come back around to the reality that all that material on that hook may not be necessary. At a minimum, tie some minimums. Sparse patterns that are suggestive, have movement, but are a fraction in quantity of materials and focus on presentation/location. It doesn’t lessen the sport to experiment and possess a few minimalist patterns for the less refined fish.

Read this fine piece by Tim Rolston (The Fishing Gene) entitled “The C Word” re patterns and confidence.

Marc Fauvet wrote about pattern and presentation also in this piece.

05
Jan
14

Accepting as Gospel: Inquisitive Minds Want to Know….

A mishmash of thoughts here. About fly fishing, fly tying, nature, study and ‘the gospel’. I am a reluctant student of anything. I have never been very good at studying. I prefer to do and even then my lack of self discipline in acquiring knowledge makes the doing often less than stellar.

Like many, I look to others that have done the heavy lifting and speak with authority for the nuggets of wisdom that will help me do things better. Often times in any pursuit, the experts have more sway than perhaps they should.

-Bozo Caddis SXP SwittersB

Bozo Caddis Pupa pattern

For example, yesterday I was researching the glowing bubble effect I have ‘witnessed’ on East Lake (Oregon) with emerging Callibaetis Mayfly nymphs. Try as I might, I could not find any literature to help substantiate this observation. It has not stopped me from writing about my observation and even attempting to replicate it with a pattern called The Orb.

The Orb Ostrich

The Orb (SwittersB)

This morning, I was researching hot colored beads for fly patterns beyond the use as an egg pattern. Words like Attractor or Aggravator came into play. I was wondering why a pattern like the Bozo Caddis Pattern (above) would catch fish when natural Caddis don’t have a bright red nose. One link lead to another re Caddis when I came upon one of those clarifying moments that deconstruct our long held ‘beliefs’ and ‘truths’: the emerging Caddis Pupa enshrouded in a gas bubble, a sheath of buoyancy that propels the Pupa to the surface and upward like a missile. I have read it countless times and written it myself as ‘the gospel’ because renowned fly fishers far more knowledgeable than I had said it was so.

Read this forum exchange at TroutNut re emerging Caddis Pupa and realize that when we borrow knowledge or accept the gospel from experts in our quest to understand….we may be building a house of cards of wisdom…that we pass on and on.

I don’t believe you have to become an entomological aficionado to fly fishing. A little knowledge goes a long ways in fly selection and fly tying. But, if somethings don’t quite work out as they are supposed to based upon the experts…well maybe the experts are…well not accurate…experiment on your own. Maybe that explains why I hated tying the Emergent Sparkle Pupa and never caught a damn Trout on one!

How I tied them based on LaFontaine’s pattern and how a better pattern is suggested by Entoman:

Sparkle Pupa SB2

Half Shroud Entoman

Entoman’s Caddis Pupa Pattern is tied with a smaller, less dense shroud at the top of the fly only, and with a leaner body and minimal legs tied in as a beard.

10
Dec
13

Fly Tying: Bead Head Patterns & Sizing

Bead Heads Pupas SwittersBBead Head Patterns are simple to tie and very productive patterns. Adjust the size of bead for weight and appearance. Colors are available now that also add appeal to the pattern.

A pretty useful past post by SwittersB on Bead Sizing for Fly Patterns

14
Nov
13

Big Fish Eat Little Fish………..

I have, along the way, brought attention to streamer patterns that imitate assorted smaller fish in the water and to the fact that big fish are quite predacious toward little fish.

big little

The below photo at THE BUG PARADE speaks volumes toward the gluttony of aggressive, big fish. Check out her site for some very nice photography of nature and fish.

Bug Parade Big Little

The Bug Parade Image




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