Posts Tagged ‘Fly Tying: Damsel & Dragon

28
Mar
12

Fly Tying: Bakslengen’s

Visit the Bakslengen site for some very crisp, beautiful tying efforts.

I like this Damsel dry pattern with the braid tail and split braid wing. Simple and inviting....gluuump! Damsel Pattern

14
May
11

Fly Tying: Woolly Bugger Hackle Options

Traditional Palmered Hackle for Woolly Bugger

Below is another version, called the Mini Bugger, that has the hackle wound in the traditional wet fly wing style. The remainder of the fly is typical Woolly Bugger. Note the multi colors of marabou in the tail.

Version of Woolly Bugger: The Mini-Bugger


14
May
11

Fly Tying & Fishing: Short, stubby, ‘skimmer’ Dragon

"Skimmer" Libellulinae (Libellulidae) Dragon Nymph

I won’t overload you with Bug terminology. I would only be borrowing from more accomplished researchers. You can find plenty of excellent work by Rick Hafele, Arlen Thomason, Troutnut.com……. You do the research on the several varieties and shapes of dragon fly nymphs in the (Anisoptera > Aeshnidae (darners) > Libellulidae (sprawlers)) world. 

Many fly fishing dragon patterns will be longer, size 6-8 patters (more the darner variety). But there is a place for the smaller size 10-12, shorter and rounder patterns that slowly move about the bottom in the vegetation and muck and only rarely jet forward. A slow and low presentation is appropriate for stillwaters and quite backwaters of streams (some varieties of Dragons do inhabit slow moving stretches of rivers). 

The above pattern was tied on a size 10, 2xl nymph hook. I dubbed and spun marabou fibers stripped from the stem. Once the density is developed for each color then the marabou is trimmed to shape the bulbous rear, tapering toward the front. At the front of the abdomen, I dubbed in some deer hair and then wound the hen hackle. The head is comprised of red dumbbell eyes (melted red Amnesia mono for eyes) the wingcase is a small piece of fuzzy foam tied in at the front the eyes. The head is dubbed to form a nice round head. Then the fuzzy foam wing case is pulled over the top of the head and tied off to form a slight gap between head/thorax and the abdomen.

The presentation of the dragon fly nymph along the edges and drops of a lake should be more thoughtful than kicking along in a tube trolling a Woolly Bugger or Dragon nymph imitation. This is the primary reason you should study how insects move in their world. Study the predatory ways and movements of insects and then attempt to visualize this and match this with retrieves and assorted fly line densities. Most often dragons will crawl up vegetation, rocks and debris to emerge above the water. Some are poor climbers (squatty little gomphids) and crawl into shore.

This isn’t like trying to match the Stonefly hatches where you fish nymphs and then post emergence, fish dries. Dragon fly dries are seldom used. You want to focus on where dragon fly nymphs reside and then go there and present hunting nymphs and nymphs working toward structure to emerge.  

10
Apr
11

Stillwater Damsel Pattern (Cope’s Damsel)

I have highlighted this wonderful lake pattern before. It is easy to tie and very productive in brown or olive green. I have tied it as I first encountered it (Jim Cope via NWFFO) , on a Tiemco 200R hook. A down eye hook could be used. It is a slender pattern, with the head/eyes barely thicker than the body.

The tail is pheasant tail fibers tied into and no longer than the length of the abdomen. A body (abdomen) of dubbed hare’s mask, kept very slender. A ribbing of Silver Krystal Flash is wound up through the dubbing toward the plastic dumbbell eyes. The wingcase was tied in first with the tips extending out over the eye. I plan this so that when the tips are pulled back over the top of the eyes/thorax, they extend only half way back to mid shank and no further. Keep the head slender and dub around the plastic eyes. Once the pheasant tail fibers are secured with thread wraps behind the eyes, cut the top pheasant tail fibers to form blunt ends. I have also tied this wing case as a combination of pheasant tail fibers for the legs and paint brush bristles for the wingcase.

Mix the colors between brown, tan, light to dark green. Swim it toward shore or at least parallel in shallower depths.

10
Apr
11

Stillwater Fly Fishing: Wind Drifting

One of my enjoyable memories on many B.C. lakes is fishing up against the wind (or, rowing, kicking in bigger winds) and turning and letting the wind blow me back down a selected area. I have frequently had a damsel or dragon nymph dragging along with the speed of the wind. Whamo more often than not. More than up against the wind. Sometimes this is a gentle drift and other times you have a precise route to cover in heavier winds. Once a slot is covered, you pull out of the ride and work back up to the top and do it again.

SO LOOKING FORWARD TO SUMMER!

19
Mar
11

Fly Tying: Little Fort Leech (Spumoni For The Taking)

So many ‘must have’ options for the beginning stillwater fly fisher. Of course, the ubiquitous Woolly Bugger in assorted sizes and earth tones is a must have pattern for the lake fly fisher. The Little Fort Leech first caught my attention in, well the Little Fort Fly Shop in B.C. some 20 years ago. It has always been one of my top stillwater flies because I fish it with confidence. I have experimented with a brilliant green dash on the tail with some success, but frankly never with the successes of red. A simple black tail, black flashy chenille these days, black hackle and gold bead with that red splash. No other adornments…no flashy strands of  Krystal Flash or ribbing. This a perfect lake pattern (I recall catching a beautiful, large Redside above Maupin on this fly on a very chilly morning) whether inched, stripped, wind drifted…what ever. Dragon fly nymph, leech, baitfish?

15
Mar
11

Fly Fishing: Stillwater Lesson Plan

Several years ago, I did one of those Saturday morning classes at NWFFO’s in Portland, Oregon. Because I love fishing lakes, they asked me to do a class re Stillwater fly fishing. I put together an outline for the attendants and for myself to collect my thought and given them some idea where I was rambling towards. I attached here. My son, Tony, did the art work to liven it up a bit. The images are terribly presented, but I got them on here and blurry or not, you get the idea.


Stillwater Notes for Presentation (SwittersB) Page 1


Stillwater Lesson Plan (SwittersB) Pages 2

26
Feb
11

Fly Tying: Georgi’s (Harley) Damsel

I wanted to work on the photography lighting for my pics. Also, I wanted to point out that the often cast off hackle bottoms are a source of fluffy tail/wing material. In the Harley Damsel, I copied a pattern I saw years ago, called Georgi’s Damsel tied by Georgi Abbott of Logan Lake, BC. So, consider it a Georgi’s Damsel. I have temporarily named it Harley because the side shot looks amazingly like my goofy pup Harley. Ok, enough personal info. Additional info re Damsel Nymph-Instars at Troutnut.


27
Jan
11

Fly Fishing: Dragonfly Nymphs Video by Quao Arlo

Dragonfly Nymphs Video by QuaoArlo

Well, based upon my post below, I now see what gluttonous, little creatures they have been by the time they reach topside. Still like them.

26
Jan
11

Dragonflies and more Dragonflies…………..

My attachment to Dragons and Damsels is almost superstitious. I have expressed it here before. When out on stillwaters, they appear, especially the dragons, in a most aggressive way. My mind needs to attach some significance to this beyond ‘hey, dragons, you should put on a dragon fly nymph’. No, I have this sense they are a sign of good fortune and have come to wish me well. I knooooow! Bonkers. And, equally bonkers over Dragons and Damsels and for entirely more scientific reasons are the folks at the British Dragonfly Society.




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