Posts Tagged ‘Fly Tying: Emergers



03
Jun
11

Fly Fishing: The Pale Morning Dun (Summer’s Hatch)

For the beginning fly tier and fisher, the Pale Morning Dun is a ‘predictable’ hatch on Western rivers from June into September. It is a late morning to early evening window of opportunity  for a hatch that has a pronounced pre-hatch nymph ‘drift’ before the emergence on the surface. It is enjoyable to figure out and to fish to. It is one of several Summer hatches that are satisfying to discover and react to.

PMD Adult Wing (McKenzie River Page)

The ‘crawler’ nymphs will move from the rocks and bottom debris where they have hidden. As they move up out of the protection, toward the surface, they are now at the mercy of the currents and trout. This drift, in moderate to slower waters, can take place over an extended period of time as the nymphs drift, wiggle upward, split their wingcases atop the thorax area, wiggle further toward the surface, shed that nymphal case at the surface (emerge) and poke through the surface film (meniscus) to ‘hatch’. The adults will drift a bit further as those now upright wings (opaque) dry a bit and then they lift off into the air, fluttering and drifting with the breezes of the day, toward shore. (Is that a mega paragraph or what?)

The Clear PMD Spinner Wing

This whole process provides stages of presentation that are satisfying  & predictable: nymphs drifting along the bottom in the moderate to slower waters (careful wading, longer distance-stealth presentations?); then emerger/wet fly/flymphs/floating nymphs in the top foot or so of water to the surface; dry fly action and later spinner fall action as the females bob about in quieter side waters to lay eggs and then fall with their clear, spent wings stretched out to the sides like a partially submerged little airplane in film…drifting down in the slower currents.

So many opportunities here for presentations from bottom to top. Once you find a hatch of PMD’s on your favorite stream note its location.  Your patterns will tend toward the tan to dark tan (mottled earth tones) in sizes 16-18 over the course of the summer. You can research Google Images for PMD nymphs, emerger, dry and see a large variety of pattern options. 

 

02
Jun
11

Fly Fishing: Hi-Jinx’ed (Midges Flush)

Hi-Jinx Midge Emerger (SwittersB)

Stillwater, conventional, fly fishing wisdom is to present your chironomid/midge pattern in a vertical posture from the muck to the surface. I agree with this. There are always exceptions. I can recall  moving from one part of a lake to another and trolling along a midge pupa, that had to be bobbing between vertical to horizontal as I rowed, and getting nailed. But, a stationary, vertical presentation toward the surface is predominantly called for.

That said, I have had excellent results with a horizontal presentation for midge emergers in the film. Retrieved back, twitched or wind drifting, a pattern tied and presented in a horizontal path does provide positive results on top.

Now I am talking stillwaters, re that maneuver. On the slower tailouts of rivers, a drag free, dry fly presentation is appropriate. A light wire hook is better on a river to maintain a mostly horizontal position for the fly. The rear end of the fly will cant downward because of the lack of a tail to prop the fly up in the surface, or pattern design.

With the Hi-Jinx pattern above, the fly is tied smaller on a size 16 hook. This is not a bad idea for some patterns: still go somewhat small for the hook size and then reduce further the pattern size on the shank of the hook. The positives of the pattern will overcome the perceived negatives of the exposed hook. Pattern + Presentation will usually overcome most negatives.   

08
May
11

Fly Fishing: Hemostat Triple Twist~Grab Tag & Pull

h/t to John Newbury from FB re this knot tying technique: The Hemostat Knot.  This might be particularly helpful when the finger tips are frozen, or for general use.


For the beginning fly tier, you would be well served to practice your tying techniques while tying a limited scope of patterns. The temptation is to tie every pattern in that book and more that come to mind. Tie this and tie that. If you were limited to just tying as a past time with no opportunity to fish your creations, then tie hither and yon, but otherwise I would stay toward basic nymphs, dries, emergers, streamers and flymphs/wets (or, the basic patterns for the species you chase….it could be a variety of streamers only for a predatory species). This way there is a practical benefit to your targeted tying.


Flymphs: this style of ‘wet’ fly is worth a study on your part and worth a lot of tying. Selection of hackle and style of body are the two key considerations. Sparse patterns for almost dry fly presentations have/had their place. But, buggier dubbing and softer hackling offer a great deal of animation and life. A flymph can fish from the bottom up to the top with the correct presentations: Leisenring Lift.


A couple presentation considerations: study spey (two hander) casts and research their applicability to a single hander. Jean Paul from Roughfisher mentioned this the other day and it true. Line handling with bigger flies or more staged presentations can be easier by moving line, dumping it and then rolling it out into a zone. Research this. Also, for the stream fishing angler chasing primarily trout there is a tendency toward only using a floating line and rarely a sink tip. I use five lines for stillwater but severely limit myself on rivers when chasing trout. (I carry multiple spey line heads). But, a readers comment about using sinking lines and manipulating the fly up through pools and rapids reminded me of watching an old timer fish streamers with a clear, intermediate line to fish streamers on a river (something I would normally only use on a lake). 

24
Apr
11

Fly Tying: Reverse Hackling (Tenkara’s Sakasa-Kebari)

REVERSE HACKLING CONCEPT~TENKARA’S SAKASA-KEBARI

The ever creative Anthony Naples at Casting Around has had an infatuation the Tenkara fishing concept. One of the techniques in tying Tenkara flies is the wrapping the hackle wing so that it slopes forward over the eye (sakasa-kebari). In this piece, Anthony has combined the reverse hackle with that daunting tiny fly (let’s see how many flies we can put on a penny/dime?) style. This is an interesting concept for tiny flies in the film. Study the ideas and note that Anthony highligted another tier that has also combined the reverse hackling and small hooks. Also, explore Anthony’s site for beautiful fly fishing related art work.

Sakasa Kebari (Reverse Hackling) Anthony Naples

 

16
Apr
11

Fly Tying: Recap ~ Lil’ Grey Emerger

Some times a drought of thought or ideas (life, fishing, tying, blogging), calls for revisiting the past and reconnecting to the tried and true: I have high lighted this little gem before and I think it is a great beginner’s pattern, for the tier, especially for still waters. In the film and just subsurface it is very successful. Equally so working up from the depths. I know, I know..even out of a beginning fly tying class or from a book out of the shop, you can tie more complex patterns…yes, yes. But….

Review the simple tying steps, maintain the sparse profile, study the pics, rib it or not and believe.

The Lil’ Grey can be tied with different shades of Anron/Zelon (I wouldn’t use the kwinkle synthetics). These patterns were tied size 18. I tied size 14-18 to follow the seasonal mayfly progression of larger to smaller sizes. This makes a dandy in the surface Chrionomid emerger. Try it. Idon’t guarantee to much here, because that is the way of fly fishing. I headge a bit re this pattern. 

Lil’ Grey                              Lil Grey 2

31
Mar
11

Fly Tying: Elegant Emergers (John P. Newbury)

I recently had the good fortune to make the FB acquaintance of John Newbury, an Oregon tier. His work is admittedly beyond the beginning tier. However, his pattern images are so inspiring (crisp, clean, beautifully photographed) that I bring them to you as inspiring and as exceptional standards to be strived for……………….   (my sincere apologies to John. In the original post I spelled his name Newberry)


JOHN P. NEWBURY FLY TYING (EMERGERS)

27
Mar
11

Fly Tying: Snowshoe Hare Emerger

This is a simple, effective pattern for the beginning tier. It utilizes a simple scraggly, dubbed abdomen/thorax and a wing/clump of the Snowshoe Hare fur.

How To S-T-S Tutorial or Snowshoe Hare Emerger

Bob Wyatt Snowshoe Hare Emerger (Danica)

Danica Site Info




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