Posts Tagged ‘Fly Tying Photography

29
Jan
12

Fly Tying: Smooth or Dubbed Bodies

I frequently use a heavily weighted Caddis Pupa pattern as a point fly (kind of a Czech Nymphing rigging). The question of whether to tie a dubbed abdomen or a smooth abdomen has never been settled for me. I tie both and frankly have success with both styles. The scraggly, dubbed body has trailing fibers that suggest life and attracts, I think, by creating a shroud of bubbles about the fly’s body.

The smooth bodied Pupa pattern (latex wrapped to create smooth, segmented abdomen) keeps that wet, translucent look to the fly. The smooth body’s complimented with the gently dubbed thorax, which gives a hint of movement.

Which is better? Tier’s discretion and fish’s selection. Try them both. Match the fly’s weight to the water’s depth and speed (streams).

28
Jan
12

Swallow The Fly: Photo Inspirations

SWALLOW THE FLY HAS SOME NICE PHOTOGRAPHY & PATTERNS

 “Our mission is nothing more or less than providing you with the most comprehensive, best-photographed multi-species fly pattern database on the world wide web.”

22
Jan
12

Fly Tying: Dandy Lil’ Sedge Pattern

SEDGE PATTERN BY GLEN POINTON @ FLY FORUMS UK 

I like the simplicity of this Caddis (Sedge) pattern and the use of CDC is an added bonus for floatation and the suggestion of life. The ‘cock de leon‘ feather fibers my not be readily available to you, but the author/tier describes their use for the antenna, a consistent ‘trigger point’ that entices the fish to take.

This Sedge/Caddis pattern would set low in the water with the antenna in view as well.

19
Jan
12

Fly Tying: Simple Thread Bodies

The vast majority of the flies you tie with have material wound onto the shank of the hook to form the abdomen/thorax of the fly. On smaller flies, I have experimenting with a more minimalist style of tying. On some patterns, I have simply used the tying thread for the abdomen with maybe a ribbing of thread as well. The results have been favorable for emergers & dries.

In the above pattern, the Olive Zelon tail/shuck was tied in at the thorax and the olive 14/0 thread was wrapped down the shank toward the bend and then back up to the thorax are. That is the extent of the body (abdomen). There is one turn of dyed olive peacock herl to form a thorax, a tuft of CDC for the swept back wing and a few turns of brown hackle. The thread head is finished off with the same olive tying thread.

Here, I wrapped the olive thread body and went with another color thread to provide a ribbed/segmented appearance. It really doesn't work. The threads appear to have been twisted and when wrapped does not lie flat. The strands of CDC hanging down to the sides would provide life like motion, but again, this was unintentional and created by the hackle wraps, which forced a few strands downward...a good thing possibly. This is why I need to only tie with my new goggles, to better see the mistakes and correct as I go. Does the fly's outcome matter? Probably not, but at some point, does one seek uniformity or tie willy-nilly? For you to decide.

18
Jan
12

FlyRecipes.com Revamped & Improved

Joe Mathis has spent considerable time to improve his great tutorial tool, FlyRecipesdotCom. Some very outstanding tyers on board (and, one not so good) plus videos, feel good shots and much more. It   is already becoming an excellent repository for excellent fly patterns to discover and tie. Contact Joe Mathis and provide him with details about your patterns. The site is free, so sign up and log in.

Joe Mathis, the creator or Fly Recipes dot Com has revamped the site!!

Oh, and just a most humble finger point to SwitterB at FRdC

17
Jan
12

Fly Tying: Less is More? OMG! I forgot I had that……

This Midge Pattern is tied sparse and lively. One turn of hackle, an extended dubbed body and a few strands of trailing shuck. It would ride low and have considerable movement. Size 20

This Midge pattern has the same trailing shuck material, a dyed peacock herl abdomen, a touch of dubbing for the thorax, and a CDC wing faced with one turn of Starling. It is tied medium bodied. Size 18

This pattern is fully, maybe even over, dressed and better suited for the edges of riffles and seams. Midges prefer the slower glides of tailouts and silty bottoms. The same trailing shuck material is perhaps over done. The abdomen of herl is obscured by the dubbed collar of Snow Shoe Rabbit fur. I would still fish it with confidence. To the eye, on a size 20 hook, it looks tiny and white.

I am not going to write any thing too profound here. Conditions (type of insects, location of feeding, how the fish are feeding) often dictate the pattern selection. I offer up these patterns as experiments in the early tying season. I was experimenting, and as I often do, just having fun with the materials.

I love finding a plastic bag, opening it to find materials I purchased and forgot about…”Yeehaw! I forgot about that stuff”. I loaded up on some cool stuff last year. The task now is to stay on task and tie more than a couple of each pattern before jumping to the next pattern…like a fart in a windstorm.

I still have to tie several dozen unweighted, earth tone Woolly Buggers to compliment the weighted ones. How boring a prospect is that…of course, until this Spring when I am fishing the shoals with those slower sinking morsels.

16
Jan
12

Callibaetis Redux

Almost had it. Tried the pile of Callibaetis Nymphs on the coin again and the Callibaetis nymph alone. Slight improvements. 

16
Jan
12

Fly Tying: A Brace of Wets

I love the Starling feather for wrapping a wing on a small (16-22) wet fly. I tied up just a couple wets, as time allowed. It has been a hit and miss proposition of late. I usually start about now and tie in earnest into the Spring. The below flies are tied on a size 18 hook/14/0 thread.

I took some pics and that allowed me to continue my learning process with Lightroom 3. I maybe did a touch better, because of Wayne Mumford’s ~ WillFishForWork advice, so I need to be a bit more exacting on lighting, white balance, taking notes re settings and in the processing of the pic, staying consistent (not sure how to do presets, etc.)

The body material for the top two flies was from Kevin Compton at Performance Flies of Cleveland,  Ohio. Also, note the difference in the top two flies re a thorax to splay the Starling feather and no thorax. I used dyed peacock herl from Nature’s Spirit.

15
Jan
12

Lightroom….But none’s shining in my noggin

When I had a Dell, I got by nicely using Photoscape, Picasa and Microsoft Picture Manager. I sprung for a Mac and I have not been very happy with the offerings (IPhoto, Gimp). So, I bought Adobe Lightroom 3 and so far I have a sense of when I was back in high school in that Algebra class. I didn’t receive good marks. 

I was experimenting with apertures and f-stops. I settled on this and am passing it off as some artistic effort and you will be none the wiser. How embarrassing.

First of all it is probably partly garbage in/garbage out. I have somehow forgotten how to set my lighting up and white back grounds turn out blue or grey (I know, simple for most, but not me. I even have the Dummies book for my Canon XTi). My beautiful Canon EF 100mm macro is begging me to figure things out. So, forgive my shots. If you think you didn’t clean your glasses or are having a dizzy spell….you’re not! It’s me.

Things are a bit busy and chaotic right now so in time I will get set up, study up and not burden you with my experiments. I’m going with the glass is half full concept with my pictures.

A little Callibaetis nymph. The fly is not straight on so the simple effort to have it in focus, front to rear eluded me.

14
Jan
12

Fly Tying the Random Tuft: Midges

If you followed here over the last few years, you know I am not an exacting fly tier. I admire those that are, but I am in the ‘impressionistic’ category…a deluded bunch who rationalize our tying with poor vision and various other maladies (not funny I know…I have a dear friend in one of these categories). So, let me move to my usual excuse, my vision. Last year I bought those magnification goggles. A purchase that has improved my tying to some degree and relieved some frustrations.

A pile of randomness, designed to baffle trout and agitate them.

The frustration comes about when I try to photograph some small fly and upon seeing my creation via the macro lens, I am brought up short at how imprecise I am. Even now with my goofy goggles, I tie with a degree of chaos. Oh well, no two flies alike and it seems to suit me. Of course, don’t let that dissuade you from striving for perfection.

I wonder in both patterns, if snipping off the bottom portion of the hackle would improve hook-ability on such small hooks? I have had reasonable success with Griffith’s Gnats, so I imagine these will grab just fine. The nippers can always touch up the fly if needed.

I haven’t photographed many flies in the past several months, so my settings are off and I hope you will forgive the lighting/backgrounds and clarity. 




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