Posts Tagged ‘Fly Tying: Streamers & Baitfish

09
Nov
11

Fly Tying: Helmet Head Sculpin Pattetn

This is a nice sculpin pattern highlighting a few interesting materials used in the construction of the pattern. Shape/profile and movement are enhanced. The video speeds up at points to expedite the more tedious portions. If you miss a stage then ‘re-wind’. Nice work…. Helmet Head @ Catching Shadows     c/o  Agitated Angler.          

                                                                                

Helmet Sculpin @ FlyMenFishingCompany.Org

                                                                                Helmet Head Info                                                                              

28
Oct
11

Sculpin S-B-S for Browns or …………?

Predator fish appear to clobber the Home Invader by Doug McKnight given the success of Satoshi Yamamoto at Lefty Angler Blogspot. Here is a S-B-S by McKnight and a look at Satoshi’s Montana angling experiences. I like the anchoring of the dumbbell eyes atop the lead wire wraps base. Open loops, side arm/over the top casts (Belgian casts?) or chuck and duck. Barb the hook.

Doug's Home Invader Sculpin pattern (LeftyAnglerBlogspot)

07
Aug
11

Fly Fishing: Streamer Presentations

Streamer Presentation Techniques

The reality on many streams and lakes is that ‘baitfish’ imitations account for many large fish. Probably, in many instances, streamers account for more trophy fish than the traditional fly  patterns. That said, many anglers don’t have a streamer pattern in their boxes or forget where they are. So, a good over view of how to fish a streamer, particularly on a river is in order. There is more to it than the wet fly swing/strip it back presentation. I have an assortment of Muddler’s, Spruce Flies and, of course, Woolly Buggers in my streamer box. Do I fish them enough…nope.

10
Jun
11

Fly Fishing: Colorful Attractions

Throwing Something Colorful At Them (SwittersB~PP)

As a beginning fly fisher (fly tier), you might want to explore the use of color to attract fish. This is standard thinking for Steelhead gear guys: egg color, spinner blade/body color, Corky-Birdie Drifter color. Steelhead, Pike, Saltwater fly fishers put a lot of emphasis upon color as well. Trout fisherman of old did more than we do today. So much of today’s fly pattern/presentation is focused upon sub-surface, natural tones of color, as it should be. But, as some of you might recall, Red was a common attractor color incorporated into many older patterns as a body or tail color.

 I came upon an old (1964,  S.I. Vault) article by Peter H. Boyle that is interesting re his experiments with Bass and Color, Movement & Flash. It is always worth a read to add variables to your arsenal of presentation to provoke a strike. Boyle’s research is indeed interesting and there is that old standby color, red,  for shallow water presentations.

 Photo by PP at Salmon Creek, Middle Fk. Willamette River watershed.

Fish Eyes 1 

Fish Eyes 2

Fish Eyes 3

Fish Eyes 4

31
May
11

Fly Fishing: Lesser Fish

As Winter closed out, our minds seemed steered toward BWO’s, March Browns, Stoneflies, Caddis and the march of pending Mayflies: PMD’s, PED’s, Green Drakes, Yellow Sallies, on and on into the Fall’s October Caddis. Of course, that is for rivers and streams. If you fish any lakes, as I do quite a bit, then there is a whole array of different morsels to consider…I won’t bother you with that here.

I am still experimenting with Sculpin, Dace, Shiner patterns. But, aside from seeing some Sculpins last Summer, I have not done enough research on them. So, I am going to continue my observations on the water; research watersheds and lakes that I fish throughout the year, and peruse the images for streamer patterns that would match the lesser fish species scurrying about the substrate and debris of rivers and lakes.

Below image: The fly’s color maybe confusing with the bluish hue. It is Hareline’s Ice Dub UV Grey & Brown blended. It turns a mottled brown in the water.

14
May
11

Fly Tying: Woolly Bugger Hackle Options

Traditional Palmered Hackle for Woolly Bugger

Below is another version, called the Mini Bugger, that has the hackle wound in the traditional wet fly wing style. The remainder of the fly is typical Woolly Bugger. Note the multi colors of marabou in the tail.

Version of Woolly Bugger: The Mini-Bugger


08
May
11

Fly Fishing: Hemostat Triple Twist~Grab Tag & Pull

h/t to John Newbury from FB re this knot tying technique: The Hemostat Knot.  This might be particularly helpful when the finger tips are frozen, or for general use.


For the beginning fly tier, you would be well served to practice your tying techniques while tying a limited scope of patterns. The temptation is to tie every pattern in that book and more that come to mind. Tie this and tie that. If you were limited to just tying as a past time with no opportunity to fish your creations, then tie hither and yon, but otherwise I would stay toward basic nymphs, dries, emergers, streamers and flymphs/wets (or, the basic patterns for the species you chase….it could be a variety of streamers only for a predatory species). This way there is a practical benefit to your targeted tying.


Flymphs: this style of ‘wet’ fly is worth a study on your part and worth a lot of tying. Selection of hackle and style of body are the two key considerations. Sparse patterns for almost dry fly presentations have/had their place. But, buggier dubbing and softer hackling offer a great deal of animation and life. A flymph can fish from the bottom up to the top with the correct presentations: Leisenring Lift.


A couple presentation considerations: study spey (two hander) casts and research their applicability to a single hander. Jean Paul from Roughfisher mentioned this the other day and it true. Line handling with bigger flies or more staged presentations can be easier by moving line, dumping it and then rolling it out into a zone. Research this. Also, for the stream fishing angler chasing primarily trout there is a tendency toward only using a floating line and rarely a sink tip. I use five lines for stillwater but severely limit myself on rivers when chasing trout. (I carry multiple spey line heads). But, a readers comment about using sinking lines and manipulating the fly up through pools and rapids reminded me of watching an old timer fish streamers with a clear, intermediate line to fish streamers on a river (something I would normally only use on a lake). 

22
Apr
11

Fly Fishing Streamers: Adjustments in Order

Artwork by Blanca Pistillo

A few days ago, I was watching a man work a run outside of Eugene. He was working a nice little tube fly across and letting it swing through a nice seam. He was fishing for Steelhead. Obviously very eager for the vanguards of the Summer run.

About him, Caddis and a few Mayflies flitted about. More telling were the dozens of birds swooping right above the surface, dining upon the emerging insects. My immediate impulse, like most of us looking for indicators, would have been to put on a dry or emerger. And, minus the birds, I would have been nymphing. I have remarked about my mental block re streamer patterns. It almost never occurs to me, on an Oregon river, to fish a streamer (some how, it does for Browns on a lake). I have noticed the Sculpins scurrying about the rocks as I wade a river, and I did previously vow to tie more Sculpin patterns and to fish them this coming year (I need to get busy) .

Recently, on a FF discussion group, there was a decidedly pro swing the streamer contingent discussing the merits of the streamer and how some local shops downplay the worthiness of the patterns. So, this is a renewed vow to think broader….use more streamers (I know this sounds silly/elementary to many anglers about the world, who routinely swing streamers).

So for the beginning fly fisher this is a reminder to carry an assortment of streamer patterns to represent the baitfish of your regions rivers and lakes. There is a whole dimension re streamer fishing that is much like traditional Steelhead (or Pike) fishing. 

I won’t reinvent the wheel here. There are several good posts, on-line, regard (‘streamer pattern tactics’) on where to cast a streamer…how to retrieve the streamer…what type of fly line to use (floating, sink tips, clear intermediates)…what patterns to use…how to tie streamer patterns. My intent here is to say…’remember the streamer’!

Spruce Fly by SwittersB



27
Nov
10

Fly Tying: Spinning Deer Hair (Muddler Minnow/Streamers)

One of the best trout and bass flies around. Everyone should have this fly in their box. Spinning the deer hair head forms that blunt head that displaces water and attracts attention.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Spun Deer Hair and Muddler Minnow Variation (SwittersB)

06
Nov
10

Fly Tying: Mottled Experimentation

Nothing extraordinary here. Just experimenting with colors when wet. Odd, even goofy looking when dry, not bad when wet, but a little weak in the shoulders, behind the cone head. I do sometimes wet a nymph or streamer pattern to see how it looks wet, on a paper towel. Some materials, like marabou, are much more active in the water than when swept back out of the water. I think I would forget the front black hackle and build up that area with dubbing or hair collar of some sort.

Hackle Barring and colors for mottled look? SB

Hackle Barring and colors for mottled look? SB

Some mottling; too thin behind the cone (SB)




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