Posts Tagged ‘Flymph

04
Feb
14

The Flymph: Not Quite Nymph…Almost Adult

A Flymph is a great fly pattern for the beginning tier and serviceable as a fishing pattern for all fly fishers. A combination of the nymph and what we now call the ’emerger’, it entices with movement and general shapes. It suits my ‘impressionistic’ almost, but not quite tying style (some might call it sloppy/lazy) and it is productive in streams and lakes. More here re flymphs

 

Flymph SwittersB-Here, I dubbed a tapered fly from the rear (abdomen) up into the thorax, creating a buggy/leggy/winged front end. Flymphs can be/maybe should be tied with a bit cleaner style with a clearly defined tail/abdomen (nymph like) and then a wet fly style thorax/head. Presentation, as always, is important. The wet fly swing or Leisenring lift (rising, emerging insect) are traditional presentation options for flymphs/soft hackles/wets. Here Oliver Edwards offers his suggestions that contradict the ‘swing’/down and across presentation. On lakes, I have simply cast to rising fish or used as a searching pattern with a straight forward cast it out and slowly work it back letting the fibers work their twitching magic. (Additional information)

25
May
13

Fly Tying: Sparser Dressings Provoke

Over dressing a fly pattern abdomen, thorax and wing is easy to do. The temptation is to do this because visibility of the fly is increased…life like appearances might be enhanced…the shape may be more realistic.

wet2wet1

Tying sparser (much like tying on smaller hooks) is a leap of faith for many. Here is a nice review of the sparsely dressed Flymph patterns at Bakslengen (Vegard Jønnevald).

Bucky PLaying Lunker Wet SB

Stillwaters really test your faith in smaller patterns, once one gives up the comfort of Woolly Buggers and the like. Here my wife plays a nice stillwater trout that took a small, sparsely dressed wet in the film during a Chironomid (Midge) emergence.

My patterns above, although quite productive, are over dressed in comparison to some of the sparser dressed patterns that do attract a fish’s attention. Skinnier bodies, one turn or less of hackle and fewer thread wraps produce a sparsely dressed fly that does produce.

Bucky Trout SB

03
May
13

Fly Tying: Simple Wet Fly to Tie

cdc-starling-emerger-14SBIn honor of and in response to…the early season mayflies and caddis: a simple wet/flymph (I don’t want to debate what a flymph is picky fly tiers!) here is a simple to tie fly pattern. 

The fly can be fished in the film (surface) or sunk for a straight or swung retrieve.

The ‘recipe’ or pattern for this very simple fly is as follows:

Size 14 heavy wire hook

Size 8/0 thread, black

Tail:  A half dozen strands of Zelon fibers to represent a trailing shuck

Abdomen: A simple thread body wound forward, back and forward over the  Zelon fibers up to the thorax area

Thorax: A spun collar of tan CDC fibers (Duck Butt feathers that float well)

Wing: One plus turns of a Starling feather so the tips of the feather reach back to the abdomen area.

03
Jul
11

Fly Tying: Wet Fly (Oversized Hackle Barbs for Wing)

USING OVERSIZED HACKLE ON SMALLER HOOK FOR WET FLY

Pulling hackle barbs off of a larger hackle and tying them in over the eye of the hook, then after creating a body, pulling them back over the body. Key: make the barbs only the length of the hook shank (not longer or shorter). 

Oversized Barbs Used Here and Pulled Back Over Peacock Herl Body (SwittersB)

27
Feb
11

Fly Tying: A Brace of Wet Flies

A little experimentation with Flexi-Floss and heavier wire ribbing for a more pronounced segmentation effect. The wet flies were tied on a size 14 and a size 16 Mustad 3906 hook. Love this hook. The verdict is out on how the body material will impress fish. To the naked eye it looks ok and as usual to the macro it looks a bit troubled. I would normally use a finer copper ribbing but I thought I would see how the larger ribbing came across. For those that like a cleaner appearance, the patterns look a bit clunky. Yet, I bet they will fish just fine. A dubbed thorax separated the abdomen from the Starling wing. It a simple fly to tie; could even be simpler. Any number of combination exist for the simple wet fly, soft hackle, flymph….call it what you will in your fair corner of the earth.

I know...a bit weak in the bum.


20
Feb
11

Fly Tying: Hackle Placement & Bead

I tied a ‘flymph’ style yesterday with the bead in front of the wing. Ross Slayton suggested I place the bead in a thorax position to facilitate better flair of the hackle. I tied one up that way and  it obviously facilitates flair although I used too big of a bead on a size 18 hook. Smaller bead/thorax next time. Starling wing looks great. As I started the pattern, I knew the bead was too big but proceeded anyway. Heed your accumulated tying instincts to back up or pause before continuing. Turned out ok, but proportions caused me to crowd the hackle between the bead and the eye. Next one…..


19
Feb
11

Fly Tying: Bead Head Flymph

I imagine my steelheading brethren cringe at the site or mention of a trout fly. And, I am equally certain those that chase trout (the non-ocean going variety) would take exception to me categorizing my concoction as a flymph. I first heard of flymph’s while reading the works of Dave Hughes and Rick Hafele in the early 90’s. I understood it to be a basic nymph pattern (not a wet) with an additional use of a wound hackle at the front (soft hackles). Here, I have added a root beer brown bead. The original flymphs were without a bead for sure. The tail and abdomen are dyed peacock herl and the thorax is a concoction of dubbings (dark brown). The hackle is from a PP Starling patch. No wingcase. The hook is an old Mustad 3906.




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