Posts Tagged ‘materials

20
Dec
16

keeping the roof on…

dwelling on Christmas Island (Kiritimati)

house-kiritimati-christmas-is-swittersb

21
Jul
15

Stillwater Dragon Fly…

dragon-fly-nymph-stout-swittersb

rainbow trout-SwittersB-photography-fly fishing-SwittersB-2

Oregon Rainbow Trout, Caught/Released by SwittersB

The abdomen of the dragon fly pattern is densely wound marabou (staggered colors) in a dubbing loop. The shaggy body is then trimmed with scissors or a razor blade (I prefer scissors). A wound hackle for legs and pheasant tail fibers for the wing case over the top of the plastic dumbbell eyes. The head here is dubbing but can be wound marabou fibers or ostrich herl fibers. I do not weight this pattern but prefer to take it subsurface with an Intermediate sink line fishing the shoreline of lakes out to the drop.

20
Jul
14

Fly Fishing & Tying: Busy Body

One of the enjoyable subsets of fly fishing is fly tying. Learning to tie and fish your own creations…and that attract fish. There are, it seems, a gazillion fly patterns out there. Really there are a few hundred patterns and many derivations of a single pattern. It is part of the exploratory/creative process of fly tying to change up patterns and to adapt patterns to new materials and successful experimentations.

wet fly-bead head-biot wing-dubbing-photography-macro-SwittersB

Here a simple wet fly pattern (wound partridge wing and dubbed body) is jazzed up with the addition of a gold bead head, white goose biots wings, orangish goose biots tail, copper ribbing over the addition of synthetic flash into the dubbing mix. All these materials flex, compress, pulse, twitch, flash as the fly drifts and tumbles through the riffles of a stream. It attracts, hopefully, by suggesting life.

fuzzy thorax-fly tying-macro-photography-SwittersB

This macro image of the abdomen/thorax of the fly gives a glimpse of the fibers protruding from the dubbed (wrapped) material on the hook. Each protruding fiber will move, collect bubbles, all suggesting a living insect below the surface of the water….hopefully. A Busy Body as it were.

13
Apr
14

The Mouse’s Last Meal

I went out this morning to do an inventory on fly tying materials, in what I thought was a fairly secure container. I haven’t tied that much in the last few months. So, I was a bit surprised to find a deceased mouse inside the container surrounded by a gooey mass of rubber legs used for fly tying. The mouse/mice had entered via a very small crack and had their way, until one of them had his fill of too much synthetics.

photography-mouse skeleton-SwittersB

photography-dead mouse skull spine-SwittersB

I found this kind of interesting from a photographic perspective and snapped a few shots. As I finished, I looked across the room and noticed Penny the Cat with a most displeased expression. I muttered, ‘Pretty cool huh Penny?’ (Yes I carry on conversations with all my pets, and they answer sometimes too).

Photography-Pets-Cats-Tabby-SwittersB

Penny the Cat: ‘Whatever. Leave me alone in that garage and I could solve that problem.’

13
Feb
14

Marabou: Excellent Fly Tying Material

brushed leech SwittersB

The macro lens reveals the Marabou tail feather is not of the best quality that I used.

Here is an excellent piece re Marabou feathers by Paul Joergensen at Global Fly Fisher

03
Jan
14

The Finer Four: Delicate & Lively

I put together this macro collage of four fly tying materials that are special for smaller flies (even larger). The materials (Pheasant Tail, Ostrich, Starling, Peacock) are truly wonderful, natural materials that manage well on the smaller flies (16-22). Also, I have found them to be fairly durable (yet delicate) to handle while applying. Give them a try for tails, abdomens, thorax, wings, shucks, legs. They are usually available in fly shops and online. 

Finer Four SwittersB

27
Mar
13

Fly Tying: Full Steam Ahead………………

SwittersB fliesI store most of my flies in boxes with little cubicles. Later they may get transferred into the foamed fly box. The flies, especially the dries are often smooshed together over time. The hackles are askew and different than how they looked out of the vise. If one takes the time, steam can be used to resurrect those flies. It can also be used to spruce up fly tying materials. Here Don Bastian provides helpful advice on steaming feathers. Don has a very nice ‘wet fly’ site. There is much to be inspired by on Don’s site.




Below @ “The Past” you can search back to 2008 month by month

November 2017
M T W T F S S
« Oct    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Visitors

Map
Count your blessings, instead of your troubles. You attract more blessings by acknowledging the ones you already have, no matter how small they may seem.

Welcome to SwittersB & Exploring. Please Share, Comment & Like Away!

Please subscribe just below. Use the Search box to search topics.

Enter your email address to subscribe to the SwittersB blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 3,716 other followers

The Past

Dutch Meyers Said…….

"Fight 'til hell freezes over, then fight 'em on the ice." Search Box Below

231!!! Countries Visiting SwittersB~Thank You!!!

free counters

Blog Stats: There are lies, damn lies and statistics

  • 4,204,004 Visits/Views (WP Original Stat~Pre Flag Counter Stats)

Sic Semper Tyrannis


%d bloggers like this: