Posts Tagged ‘Mayflies

06
Oct
12

Fly Fishing: Wiggle Cast = Increased Hook Ups

In Handbook of Hatches by Dave Hughes, pages 87/88: “Learning to add wiggle to your emerger and dry-fly presentations will do more to increase your catch than any other single thing you can do, when you’re fishing over rising trout. Wiggle is important in the cross-stream reach cast. It is critical in the downstream wiggle cast. It can even help you take a few more trout in up-and-across-stream presentations. A little wiggle added to almost any cast will increase the likelihood that your fly will get a free drift. That will always catch you more trout, whether you’re fishing a mayfly emerger, dun, spinner, or any other insect imitation on the surface.

A nice fish to a chrionomid (midge) emerger.

Here is a short video that demonstrates the words describing the wiggle cast at Sexy Loops (remember shooting a bit of line makes all the difference on imparting the wiggles).

04
Oct
12

Fat Mayflies = French Road Hazard

The waters are so healthy that certain October mayflies are fat laden (that French Cooking) on French streams. Slippery When Fat!!! Or pleasingly healthy depending upon your tastes.

Caution Fat Mayflies!!!

I can’t speak to all mayfly species, but those that still exist in October are smaller, like size 18’s heading into Winter. Small patterns, lighter tippets. Reverse the size come Spring for many mayfly species.

14
Aug
12

Swimmer Nymphs & Pheasant Tail Backstrap

The Swimmer Nymph: The slender bodied nymph that undulates to the surface film (as opposed to crawlers, clingers, borrowers). Blue Winged Olives generally fall into this category and are often considered, over all, one of the more important mayfly species to learn about. Below, Pheasant Tail fibers are an excellent material to help represent that slender, swimming body. It was also used here for the wing case and gives that fuzzy effect. The Pheasant Tail fibers were run back over the top of the abdomen and extended into the tail. I wrapped the wire ribbing forward over the top of the pheasant tail pieces to secure them (Skip Nymph technique for back strap over abdomen). Some, in a more exacting style, would opt for fewer pheasant tail fibers, say 3, in an attempt for matching the natural image (3 tails).

04
Jul
11

Fly Fishing: Observe & Study

One of the enjoyable aspects of fly fishing (and also of fly tying) is the why of it all. This is then followed by the how, what, where, when of it all. You observe as you pass through the wild. You take it all in. Insects on the rocks, on the water, in the air, on the shore side bushes. Birds scurrying about and maybe the fish visibly feeding.

You observe what is going on and make a selection or many selections in attempting to solve this transitory puzzle. Maybe you are partially or totally successful; maybe you zero out. If so, only a few will really be certain of the why. The rest will ask why and launch into followup study.

This past week, I had occasion to work over a sporadic hatch of PMD’s and two types of Caddis. I worked the convergence of currents below an island. As I watched the slashing rises down stream, I noted the pattern of rises just inside a seam on the slightly faster water side.

I only saw a few insects alighting and steadily drifting toward shoreline vegetation. I put on an a PMD emerger, a PMD dry, a PMD floating nymph. Nada. But, a greenish yellow bodied, brown hackled wet fly sporadically took fish as it swung into the area of the seam. But, there were a lot of missed/hits and bumps. Why? I noticed drag. I noticed when I reached beyond with longer casts, I through quite a few upstream mends to avoid the drag. This resulted in the wet fly sinking more before it came around and started to rise….bang.

Now, I kind of new, by now the theoretical why of this…the fish turned off by drag; the rising fly simulating an upwardly emerging something. But, I wanted to study the why a bit more. I turned to David Hughes fine book: Matching Mayflies.

SwittersB

 I researched the why and reaffirmed and improved some of my correct but muddled thinking about how mayflies emerge toward the surface. This studying of the various ways mayflies emerge from the nymphal confines was beneficial as to how I would tie various patterns in the future and as to how I would present them.

Also, tucked in Hughes book was a bit about presentation in exactly the same kind of shoreline slack water/adjacent to faster water I had encountered that same day. The casts were perfect but the offered mends did little to get the fly down or avoid drag even while I missed fish after fish. Hughes offered up: present from farther upstream and inside more; reach cast with a wiggle stack.

So, my why’s from the stream were researched when I got home to research (or you could call a friend, talk to a fly shop). I developed some what, how, where, when info (I am the who) and am eager to get back out there and try it out. This is, as I say, one of the enjoyable parts of the sport. Observe and then ask why as you pass through. 

22
Mar
09

Mayfly Pattern (extended body & drop hook by Danillo Lazzarini of Italia)

I am  not well versed in tying extended body abdomens for mayflies. It requires special equipment and I have not bothered to explore the techniques. However, the uniqueness of the patterns and the drop hook is interesting and for those of you that are well versed in the how to’s of the extended body, the drop hook component may be an interesting experiment for you in your tying. The harware for extended bodies is either a tube fly technique or the side device that allows for tension on a core material which is overwrapped with the body material. The technique goes back several one hundred + years:  

“I understood that this system was probably taken from a local 1800s tradition (the vertical hook) and then developed and perfectioned by Terenzio Zandri.”

http://www.upon-bamboo-fly-fishing-rods-and-reels.com/flytying-desks.html 

Mayfly by Danilo Lazzarini

Mayfly by Danilo Lazzarini

 

 Danilo Lazzarini’s Site (http://www.moschefacocchi.it/home_p.htm) The site is in Italian, but you can figure it out…the images are the inspiration to experiment.

Extended Body, Drop Hook Mayfly by Danilo Lazzarini

Extended Body, Drop Hook Mayfly by Danilo Lazzarini

Extended Body Techniques:

http://www.onlineflytyer.com/article_extendedspin.asp

 extended-body

http://web.thn.jp/dflyonly/Website/sub6.htm

‘tube fly construction’

tube-tool

24
Jul
08

Mayfly Basics & Flyfishing (flytying too; if you don’t tie, start! )

http://www.midcurrent.com/articles/flies/hafele_mayflies.aspx (Oregon’s own Rick Hafele writes a good basic explanation of Mayflies. His fairly recent book (with Dave Hughes) Western Mayfly Hatches, From The Rockies To The Pacific (2004, Frank Amato Publications Inc.) is a great book re Mayflies. Hafele & Hughes rate the importance of various Mayfly characteristics and the Mayflies themselves. There is much to learn and it is not overly technical…a typical feature of Hafele/Hughes work.




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