Posts Tagged ‘mildew

23
Feb
13

Repurposed Matt & Box: Wet Generosity

Perhaps you recall, in late January, I highlighted the repurposing of furniture in my fine city (Portlandia). A few weeks back, I captured a perfect example with a mattress leaning up against a street sign near my work. It stayed out in the pouring rain for several days until one morning I saw it slumped down in a pile and later that day gone. Where did it go? Taken for actual use or deemed visual abuse and gathered up dumped? I snapped a pic, but seem to have lost it. 

Imagine my surprise, when a couple days ago I came upon a generous offering not two blocks from my work. Seriously, people in this neighborhood really like to repurpose all manner of property.

Box SBLike magic, these repurposed gems just appear at first light. I don’t think I have ever seen any repurposer (my word…you can use it) actually repurposing (yes, you can use it) in broad daylight. It must be a night time thing. So, after a torrential downpour, typical of early Spring in Portland, the matt & box was still there the next day. So, one wonders how does one take such a generosity and sleep upon it?

“The moist and damp effect triggers the development of mold and mildew. These dreaded end products give off foul odors and often intensify respiratory problems. Neglecting the wetness of your mattresses can pose as a looming threat to your every day sleep. Your bed will soon transform into a breeding ground for thousands of hazardous bacteria.”

No this is not a job for a hair dryer or fan set on high speed. There is no 90 degree days looming anytime soon in this neck of damp woods. Hmmm, I wonder if there could be a better way to deposit such items so they actual could benefit a person need?

Perhaps the generous repurposer, no doubt full of typical great intentions, ala Portlandia, could figure out how to donate such items or transport them at least to a tent city (there are several in Portland) or at least deposit them under some shelter like a freeway overpass (there is a large collection of folks down underneath the I-84/I-5 interchange (note all the tarps, shopping carts and pallets that could at least temporarily use these items until rousted out. Then the city would be disposed to recycle your offering to the appropriate landfill. I mean if you are going to dump them (oops, repurpose them) anyway, make them count!

Homeless camp

Repurposers: Please note the Red X …work your way down underneath into that vicinity beneath the overpasses and donate reasonable items to the several dozen folks that have camped out down in there. Of course, be careful. They may or may not appreciate your good intentions.

16
Sep
12

Gear Bag: Simple Attention & Prevention

A few years back, I received a beautiful gear bag from my family. It is a Fish Pond bag, that set  them back a fair amount. This is a reminder to immediately take care of your gear after an outing if: you have been infrequently getting out; subject your gear to the elements; don’t recognize the assault upon your gear and put it away sopping wet!

Last Fall, about eleven months ago, I went on a trip up the Sandy River chasing some late running coho. I was wanting to get some fishing in because I was due for surgery on my neck. That late afternoon, the pain was too much to wave a spey rod, the elements intervened and I stripped off my gear, threw it in back and headed home. The gear was off loaded into the garage and forgotten.

An unfrozen zipper revealing the white corrosion that held the zipper. (SwittersB)

The results have been unfriendly to the gear bag that I value and cherish. Corrosion had seized up every one of the 16 zippers! All exhibited that white, crusty crud that had frozen the zippers. I tried silicone sprays, unstick sprays for stuck nuts/bolts…it worked on 3 of the 16 zippers. Research lead to those obvious home remedies…vinegar & lemon juice. Obvious because they work! Actually, I did much better with the lemon juice than with the vinegar. Vinegar is a pretty good resource also, but today the lemon juice was wonderful. Thank goodness.

The gear bag with some of the many zippers unstuck. The zippers have that rusty sheen, but that is more a reflection of some light source as they are not rusted or corroded on the surface, especially not after all the lemon juice and vinegar I poured down their gullet! (SwittersB)

The obvious remedy is not to put anything away wet that can’t stand the mold, mildew, corrosion and rust villains. But, I imagine there are other home remedies or over the counter resources to conquer the stuck zipper/corrosion problem. Prevention being first and foremost.

This type of gear bag probably should not get so wet, and if it does it should be immediately dried out and attention given to the zippers.

21
Feb
09

speaking of mildewy waders (clean them, renew them)

img_9240a

“Simm is reasonably specific about how to clean them. They recommend:

“Waders should be washed by hand, in a bathtub, in cold water using a powder detergent. Rinse thoroughly and allow to air dry, including the feet. Packaging or storing your waders wet may result in mildew and tape peeling. Simms Waders should not be dry-cleaned or put in the dryer. A water repellent treatment, such as Revivex®, will rejuvenate the water-resistant finish on your waders.”

I believe that they recommend powdered detergent because only enough will dissolve to create the cleaning solution. Liquid detergent can have excess detergent (beyond saturation) floating around the solution, and it can stick to the waders (where it may not all be removed by a rinse). Part of the water-repellency system for breathable waders is to have the fabric’s surface be water repellent. This allows the surface tension of the water to keep the water from wicking into the outer fabric layer and contacting the Gore-Tex membrane. Its like wax on the hood of your car – water beads up rather than spreading out into every nook and cranny. That is why they recommend the Revivex treatments periodically – just like waxing the car periodically. Any excess detergent on the waders will breakdown this part of the system, as will liquid soap because they are designed to break down the surface tension of the water.

NEVER apply detergent/soap directly to the waders. Only apply a fully dissolved solution to the waders, because it is nearly impossible to rinse off 100% liquid detergent/soap thoroughly with rinsing if it gets down in the fabric.

Getting waders dirty can also affect their water repellency for the same reason. Dirt and grime will make the outer fabric layer less water repellent. It may also get down against the waterproof membrane and wick water down to the membrane. If the water surface tension is broken by the dirt (indicated bywater wicking along the surface rather than beading up) you may get a little dampness coming through the membrane. I have personal experience with this. In areas of my old waders, I got “mullet juice” on them in a few select locations (on the inside and outside) , where I contacted the waders with my bait soaked hands. In those areas, they would feel a little damp after extended use until I thoroughly cleaned them.

P.S. Soaps tend to leave residues. so I would stick with detergent. Look up the recommendations of your wader’s manufacturer and follow them.”

crashq @ http://www.stripersonline.com/surftalk/showthread.php?t=553618




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