Posts Tagged ‘nymph

17
Jul
11

Fly Tying: Basic Dubbed Nymph for Beginning Tier

Generic Dubbed Nymph at Hip Wader that provides a good tutorial for the beginning tier

This little tutorial S-B-S provides several visuals that will help the beginning fly tier: The Bead head + wire wrapped shank. This helps add dense weight to the fly to get it down; the tail is synthetic and more durable than hackle barbs or a clump of fur; the use (dubbing) of animal fur, whether from a skin or out of a bag is a traditional facet of  tying. Learning to prepare the fur prior to dubbing is important to get the most out of the material. The Hip Wader site has nice tutorials….explore, but come back here!

Wire wrapped shank + bead head for dense weight (Hip Wader)

Another consideration here is Lead Free Wire for fly tying. I am often using lead wire on my shanks because I have spools of it, big spools. But, I have also bought and have been using the less dense, stiffer Lead Free wire. The combo of wire wraps + a bead head may provide the necessary weight to get the fly down. On smaller flies, it may be token effort without some form of shot on the leader. Either way, the combination of wire + a bead is a good tool for the beginner to consider. In more exacting imitations, a few more turns of wire and no bead may be called for. Some patterns won’t call for any weight. Swimmer nymphs fished higher in the water column don’t need to plummet to the depths. Research Lead Free wire and shot and alternative materials used in wire and shot.

 

24
Jan
11

Fly Tying: Peacock & Pheasant Tail (Simple Perfections)

As you move further into fly tying, as a beginner, you will tie the basic, often used patterns. The basic patterns are often perfect for learning how to manage certain materials and techniques. Also, the basic patterns offer another trait. The ‘basic’ patterns catch fish. Two materials frequently used in the beginner’s patterns are pheasant tail fibers and peacock herl. A single piece or two of each imparts fuzzy life to a pattern’s abdomen or thorax. Such simple effectiveness are sometimes left behind for ever more interesting materials. Etch this in your beginner’s mind: peacock and pheasant tail are must have materials for nymph bodies. Don’t forget them.

 

Wet-Pupa: Pheasant Tail Ab, Peacock Thorax, Partridge Wing, Counter Wrapped Ribbing, BH

24
Oct
10

Fly Fishing: Copper Swan~Steelhead Nymph Pattern

 

Copper Swan Relief (SwittersB)

A larger version of the original nymph pattern by John Barr (The Copper John). The Copper Swan is an equally heavy, dense chunk that will get down in a hurry when nymphing for steelhead, or as a point fly for trout fishing. This fly is adaptable to different colored hot beads, or a more neutral bead tone. The wire abdomen begs all the colors available, as do the rubber legs. I mucked up the wing case epoxy coating and got it on the hackle barbs, by not waiting for it (the epoxy) to dry before finishing with the hackle. Knapek hook & Large Wapsi wire. The pattern can be tied with two colors of wire. I experimented with black and copper/black and red/black and cream.

Copper Swan Steelhead Nymph Pattern (SwittersB)

07
Oct
10

Fly Fishing: Right Angle Nymphing & the ‘Turnover Point’

Solano FF

“Recognizing the turning point is vital to successful right angle indicator fishing. Unfortunately, a vast majority of fly anglers who uses poly yarn indicators overlook this critical component. To assist you in understanding the significance of the turning point envision the following two drift examples. Case one: This case begins with the indicator downstream of the fly, and is the most commonly encountered presentation. Because currents are faster on the surface, the indicator drags the fly and the fly very rarely finds the bottom where fish rest and forage. Case two: Here the fly lands downstream of the indicator and indicator must catch up with the fly, so a majority of grabs will go undetected. Hickson and Shubert, who pioneered and coined this technique of nymph fishing, recognized this, and were quick to note that their brightly colored poly yarn indicators would “pivot” and shift colors at the point in the drift when their fly was directly under their indicators. They referred to this pivot as the “turn over” point. Successful indicator fishing stems from achieving the turning point as fast as possible and maintaining this position during the drift through creative and multiple line mends. The result is unsurpassed strike detection even in high, fast water.”    (Capital City Weekly by Rich Culver)

The diagram does not really go with the piece by Mr. Culver, but it shows the right angle and poly indicator. Using more than one nymph or having the shot at the very bottom is a different consideration. Query R angle nymphing in Google Images and you can find some more examples.





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