Posts Tagged ‘ODFW

05
Nov
19

Pretty Bird…

“The European starling is considered an invasive species in Oregon. It was introduced from Europe.” ODFW
Pretty none the less…great for fly tying too.

30
Jun
12

Throw That Trout!!!

My son had an odd visual experience on Oregon’s East Lake this week. Maybe it was the altitude? ODFW was there doing some on the water survey of sorts using nets and boats. As my son watched their process he observed them sorting trout and as each one was handled it was then tossed, thrown and slung out from the boat some 20+ feet onto the waters surface. Given I had spent the effort in his formative years to instill a respect in handling the fish, particularly Trout, with care and ease, he was a bit aghast (as were other nearby fishers) in seeing this handling of the fish.

Now I know most of them come into the lakes via trucks and big hoses that shoot them into the water in a harsh manner, but is this normal? Is this a reflection of the ‘put n take’ handling of a commodity with no respect? The reality, I suspect, of those that handle the species day in and out and see them as nothing more than pellet eating pieces of meat that grew in a hatchery pond. We (me) attach spiritual worth to fish and surround them with the whole natural process into one tidy shrine of homage. To others, because I believe our production mentality, they are simply a food/recreation commodity handled by men doing a job on a schedule and trying to satisfy the masses. 

31
May
12

Cabela’s Step Up & Refine Your ‘Official Rules’

I received an email notification from ODFW (Oregon Dept. Fish Wildlife) re a special event where some lucky angler has a chance at $1m dollars.

Oregon may have a million dollar fish
If we do, one lucky angler could catch it in Crane Prairie, Dexter or Blue River Reservoir. All three are included in the nationwide “Wanna Go Fishing for Millions” contest sponsored by Cabelas, Outdoor Channel and several fish and wildlife agencies (including ODFW). 
See more details and register to participate.

I was intrigued that a State agency had joined forces with Cabela’s. I also noticed one of the Oregon fisheries was Crane Prairie Res., which use to be a premier fishing destination until the bass were introduced. But then given this is a nation wide contest that really doesn’t matter:

“Eligible Species of Freshwater Fish:

Largemouth Bass, Smallmouth Bass, Spotted Bass, White Bass, Walleye, Perch, Cutthroat Trout, Rainbow Trout, Brown Trout, Lake Trout, Striped Bass (Striper), Wiper, Crappie, Blue Gill, Channel Cat.”

So there is some place in the participating states that has one fish that is tagged for the million bucks, if you are the first to photo, de-tag and send proof of catch. There are other prizes as well for others that catch tagged fish but too late to qualify for the first fish caught status. Judging by the rules, it appears all manner of typical fishing methods are allowed. The rules state the handling of the fish as such…

“FISHING & LOGGING:

“Registered participants may only catch and log eligible fish during the Fishing Period, and must photograph their fish with an eligible tag showing and still attached, prior to removing the tag and releasing the fish.” 

Well I imagined there must be more precise explanations on how to remove the tag and release the fish given all the methods that must be allowed. I mean Cabela’s does care if the fish survives don’t they? Yet really no where in any of the literature is there anything past the sponsors and the prizes that promotes respect for the fish or instructions on how to handle them. 

This is so typical. Cabela’s you are making assumptions or clueless or as I suspect, irresponsible on the handling of these species of fish. It is part and parcel with the put ‘n take fisheries and, and of course, typical of ODFW too. Here’s Cabela’s Conservation Platform. Yes they are dedicated to preserving this and that for the sportsmen. But, the emphasis is on the taking not the preserving.  I know many of those species are pretty hardy, probably prehistorically hardy, but several aren’t. Cabela’s let’s see something more, in writing, about more than money, sponsors and vague one liner release remarks. 

25
Oct
11

ODFW Considering Ranch Purchase…Hearings

“The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) is considering the purchase of a 1,075-acre cattle ranch in Eastern Oregon to add to their 3,798-acre Riverside Wildlife Area.  In a statement to the press, ODFW said the McDaniel Ranch, which lies 15 miles from Juntura, would be open to the public for hunting, fishing (Malheur River), trapping, and wildlife viewing.”   More….   

Malheur River, near Juntura, Oregon (Oregon State Archives)

16
Jul
11

Stocking the ‘put and take’ trout in remote lakes

I am not even sure anymore of all the methods used to put hatchery trout into lakes. I do see the occasional tanker truck back up to a boat ramp and shoot out hundreds of assorted sized fish. I recall seeing a plane bomb a lake in the Wallowa’s Eagle Cap Wilderness almost 40 years ago with brook trout. And, I know a man that use to pull a string of pack mules into Cascade lakes in the 50’s with tin containers of small trout. These methods for putting in hatchery trout are still used in parts of the country. But, given the economic times and fuel costs (helicopters/planes/tankers), I know there is an old fashioned way being used these days.

A friend and supporter of SwittersB is participating in a ‘backpack the fish in’ exercise in Oregon this weekend. An old, large compartment framed pack is called for. From there an ODFW worker inserts a durable plastic container and the fish and enough water are introduced to the pack’s compartment to sustain the fish. A 6 mile hike into a nearby lake is the target. Stout legs going in and a light load coming out. What could be better. Check your local fishery programs for similar outings where the put ‘n take trout are stocked and not adversely effecting native species through escapement. 

Here is an except from the Eugene Register Guard in July, 2010 about the program: “About 150 other volunteers did the same, keeping up a nearly 30-year tradition of volunteers — usually the anglers themselves — stocking the high lakes they love, or at least the lakes they’ve always wanted see.

It began at 9 a.m. on July 17 at Oakridge’s fish hatchery, which sits just off Salmon Creek, near the Middle Fork of the Willamette River. First Roberts and Gore met Erik Moberly, the ODFW employee in his fourth year as head organizer for the volunteer stocking event, which runs every other year, with lakes being stocked by helicopter in the off years.”

12
Jan
11

Sandy River (Take Action for What Remains)

Trout Unlimited Chapter 678 McKenzie Upper Willamette put out some info re the state of the Sandy River (while announcing a club event). The facts speak for themselves and beg action.

Call on ODFW to restore Sandy River salmon and steelhead.

The Sandy River flows just 20 miles from downtown Portland and has the potential to be one of the healthiest suburban salmon and steelhead rivers in the world. Over the past decade $75 million has been donated towards Sandy River habitat restoration, yet the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife continues to resist any reductions in their Sandy hatchery programs. This is extremely detrimental to wild fish.

Runs of salmon and steelhead on the Sandy are currently 3-10% of their historic abundance, and continuing to decline year after year. Much of this decline can be linked to an unaccountable hatchery program. In a recent Portland Tribune article, ODFW District Biologist Todd Alsbury said that reducing the Sandy River hatchery program is a last resort.The ODFW has known for decades that hatchery fish reduce the fitness and long term abundance of wild fish, yet they have demonstrated that they are more interested in protecting their hatcheries than in protecting our wild fish. If future generations are to ever glimpse a spawning salmon, this must change.

Sandy River fall chinook, spring chinook, coho and winter steelhead are currently listed under the Endangered Species Act, and chum salmon have gone extinct.

As a supporter of Oregon’s native fish, take action here: http://tu678.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=83b81d79dfb8964f786c6133c&id=0a88b044e7&e=a57a3af76c

This is in my back yard. Ten minutes from my front door. No excuse to not be involved. I just joined the Native Fish Society.

16
Nov
08

The State of the Salmon Runs in Oregon (An indicator?)

Tillamook, Oregon

Tillamook, Oregon

While parked in Tillamook, I noticed this delivery truck. Isn’t it odd that fish is imported, to Oregon, from Alaska? What does it say about the condition of Oregon salmon runs. They use to be legendary, before over harvesting. Now, they are usually spotty or scattered. Given the immense divide between ODFW and Ecobots, as well as the mismanagement by ODFW, the runs may not recover and the bots may forever thwart any industry rebound. Back to the drawing board.    




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