Posts Tagged ‘peacock herl

15
Mar
14

Fly Tying Material: Dyed Peacock Herl

photography-fly tying-peacock--dyed-herl-swittersb

A little blurry with the cropping, but you get a sense of the segmentation and fibers/barbs of the peacock herl, which in this instance was dyed. This is an excellent material for smaller abdomens, thorax and heads.

01
Dec
13

Zug Bug Love: Peacock Love

ZugBug SwittersBMid Current Tutorial for Zug Bug Pattern here

Ah the magic of Peacock Herl. Zug Bugs, Renegades, Gray Hackle Peacock, Prince Nymphs, Pheasant Tail Nymphs…however you see an opportunity to incorporate Peacock into the Abdomen and/or Thorax of a pattern, give it a try. The Zug Bug is a simple but effective pattern from the 1930’s. You could mix up the bead & ribbing color combo’s (gold, brass, silver for flash). Of course, the original was not tied with a bead head (a more modern adaptation).

P Herl Fly Fishers Republic

Fly Fishers Republic Image

06
Jul
13

Fly Tying: Starling & Herl

starling and herl

07
Nov
12

Peacock’s & Fly Tying: A Remarkable Bird

A design on a box for a cologne or some such scent. Caught my eye, so I snapped it.

Here’s a nice piece at Sexy Loops by Jo Meder re the ‘Fabulous Pheasant’

This peacock design was off the back of my ex-wife’s blouse. I snapped it as we watched our g-daughter at a sporting event. Hey, I saw the possibilities.

Peacock is, indeed, a remarkable tying material that comes in its natural colors but these days is also dyed. It is a wonderful material whether in its natural state or dyed. Tails, wings, abdomens, thorax and wingcases…it is a must have material. 

04
Jun
12

Peacock & Peafowl (Tattoos & Fly Fishing)

There is a fascination with Peacock feathers in fly tying and fly fishing. It is a beautiful bird, a male bird. Did you know that the actual bird is a Peafowl? The male is the Peacock and the female is the Peahen. The Peafowl is the national bird of India. And, the Peacock’s plumage is the subject of many tattoo designs, particularly for women.

Even this old peacock piece was tucked away in my deceased uncle’s shop, up on a shelf amidst his tools, reloading dies and cigar boxes. He was a fly fisher and this was apparently symbolic to him.

Peafowl are omnivorous and roost in trees when not foraging for reptiles, amphibians and plant parts. (learn more here about Peafowl/Peacocks)

12
Sep
10

Fly Tying: Wet Fly (Trust in the Wet Fly)_

Not much to say about this often presented pattern. I have said it before, that I know seasoned fly fishers, who travel to the prime spots of the Western U.S. and (purposely) only fish small, wet flies. They are successful at connecting with trout. So, for the beginning fly tier and/or fisher,  this is a necessary pattern in your arsenal…punto! Mayfly, Chironomids, Caddis.

Wet Fly: Peacock Hurl body, ribbed, brown hackle (SB)

The peacock hurl body (abdomen) is wound with two hurls. The lighter green (contrast/segmentation) wire ribbing is wound up through the body. A slight thorax is dubbed with dark green synthetic dubbing. A dyed brown grizzly hackle is wrapped twice for the wing/legs. All this on a size 16 hook. Of course, as you will see with many utilitarian fly patterns….the fly lends itself to all the colors of insects and a sequence of hook sizes to cover all those possibilities.

An aside note: notice the green ribbing on the fly above. It is counter wrapped over the body material, which allows the ribbing to stay atop the body material rather sinking into the grooves of the wound body material.

04
Jul
10

Fly Tying & Fishing: Tag Ends of This & That

Double Bead Peacock Herl Nymph: A size 10 to 14 hook. You could use the swimming nymph hook or lightly bend the shank on a 3-4xl hook. Glass or metallic beads can be used and the colors could be varied. Metallic will aid in descent. The green looks nice here. The peacock herl is always an awesome material to use. The tail is more of a tag than a longer wispy tail.

Carp Fly Fishing Presentation (not sure if this piece is attributable to the university or Fly Fish Addiction site that published but did not attribute or if one in the same source. You will find some interesting suggestions).

No Retrieve: “Gary LaFontaine, in his book, Fly Fishing the Mountain Lakes, states that “a slow retrieve outfished a quick retrieve 4 to 1 and no retrieve outfished a slow retrieve four to one….I’m a specialist at not moving a fly—nymph, dry, wet, or streamer—on lakes.” (ohhh, patience, patience. Unless fishing a streamer pattern, we all tend to fish too fast. If your fly sinks too quickly and hangs up, then perhaps the fly is too heavy or the type of line is taking it down too quickly in shallow water…10′ or less).




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