Posts Tagged ‘Rick Hafele

19
Mar
15

Caddis Pupa Fly Pattern

green pupa-fly tying-caddis pupa-macro photography

Impressionistic Caddis Pupa pattern on size 14 hook.

caddis pupa-Brachycentrus-SwittersB-Hafele-The Fly Fishing Shop

Image: Rick Hafele & The Fly Fishing Shop

 

Here is a nice piece re Spring time insect hatches for the fly fisher/tier to study up on. Info via Rick Hafele and The Fly Fishing Shop in Welches, Oregon.

16
Feb
14

Good, basic, seasonal hatch information by Rick Hafele

SwittersB Rainbow Trout Release Photography

This is good, basic information for the beginner or for a review by the more experienced fly fisher (primarily U.S. focused). Explore Rick Hafele’s site re hatches and much more.

28
Oct
12

Winter Fly Fishing (Rick Hafele’s Advice)

“Nymph fishing on a winter morning will certainly hone your skills for nymph fishing other times of the year. The sluggish metabolism of winter fish means their takes are softer and subtler than ever. It also means they won’t go as far out of their way to take your fly. Thus reading the water and being able to detect the softest takes is critical if you hope to hook some winter trout. I find a strike indicator essential for such nymph fishing. I also find that casting as short a line as possible to effectively fish a piece of water improves my odds of detecting a strike and setting the hook quickly – seems fish can spit out a nymph just as fast in the winter as in the summer. Also keep moving and fish new water. Since many fish won’t be actively feeding you need to cover as many fish as possible to increase your odds of finding one ready to take a fly.”  (Hafele’s Laughing Rivers)

Short sleeves are gone in the Pacific NW. But, with some diligence and thinking, Trout can be had. Like Hafele, that idea of hammer smashed finger tips (the sensation) requires some serious mind control. Identify which streams might be open year round and then contemplate what might hatch in the Winter and after that what searching nymph patterns to use. Presentation, holding water, short lines, soft bites. Caught/Released.

26
May
11

Fly Tying & Fishing: Mother’s Day (and beyond) Caddis

RICK HAFELE ON THE BRACHYCENTRUS OCCIDENTALIS CADDIS

14
May
11

Fly Tying & Fishing: Short, stubby, ‘skimmer’ Dragon

"Skimmer" Libellulinae (Libellulidae) Dragon Nymph

I won’t overload you with Bug terminology. I would only be borrowing from more accomplished researchers. You can find plenty of excellent work by Rick Hafele, Arlen Thomason, Troutnut.com……. You do the research on the several varieties and shapes of dragon fly nymphs in the (Anisoptera > Aeshnidae (darners) > Libellulidae (sprawlers)) world. 

Many fly fishing dragon patterns will be longer, size 6-8 patters (more the darner variety). But there is a place for the smaller size 10-12, shorter and rounder patterns that slowly move about the bottom in the vegetation and muck and only rarely jet forward. A slow and low presentation is appropriate for stillwaters and quite backwaters of streams (some varieties of Dragons do inhabit slow moving stretches of rivers). 

The above pattern was tied on a size 10, 2xl nymph hook. I dubbed and spun marabou fibers stripped from the stem. Once the density is developed for each color then the marabou is trimmed to shape the bulbous rear, tapering toward the front. At the front of the abdomen, I dubbed in some deer hair and then wound the hen hackle. The head is comprised of red dumbbell eyes (melted red Amnesia mono for eyes) the wingcase is a small piece of fuzzy foam tied in at the front the eyes. The head is dubbed to form a nice round head. Then the fuzzy foam wing case is pulled over the top of the head and tied off to form a slight gap between head/thorax and the abdomen.

The presentation of the dragon fly nymph along the edges and drops of a lake should be more thoughtful than kicking along in a tube trolling a Woolly Bugger or Dragon nymph imitation. This is the primary reason you should study how insects move in their world. Study the predatory ways and movements of insects and then attempt to visualize this and match this with retrieves and assorted fly line densities. Most often dragons will crawl up vegetation, rocks and debris to emerge above the water. Some are poor climbers (squatty little gomphids) and crawl into shore.

This isn’t like trying to match the Stonefly hatches where you fish nymphs and then post emergence, fish dries. Dragon fly dries are seldom used. You want to focus on where dragon fly nymphs reside and then go there and present hunting nymphs and nymphs working toward structure to emerge.  

06
Apr
11

Fly Tying & Fishing Instruction

I was stuck in beautiful Eugene, Oregon and ended up in a Borders book store. There were, surprisingly, a scant dozen or so books of fishing. Surprising because Eugene sets amongst several excellent fishing venues within minutes of town.


I came upon a nice book by John Barr entitled Barr Flies. It is a glossy, large sized book with great visuals and a bit spendy. I liked the S-B-S tutorials on several nymph patterns and  I bought the book. I couldn’t fish, so I perused the Barr book and planned my tying to incorporate some of Barr’s patterns.

Another excellent book is Rick Hafele’s Nymph Fishing Rivers & Streams. Hafele provides a gazillion interesting facts about insects that trout eat and how to fish them.



19
Feb
11

Fly Tying: Bead Head Flymph

I imagine my steelheading brethren cringe at the site or mention of a trout fly. And, I am equally certain those that chase trout (the non-ocean going variety) would take exception to me categorizing my concoction as a flymph. I first heard of flymph’s while reading the works of Dave Hughes and Rick Hafele in the early 90’s. I understood it to be a basic nymph pattern (not a wet) with an additional use of a wound hackle at the front (soft hackles). Here, I have added a root beer brown bead. The original flymphs were without a bead for sure. The tail and abdomen are dyed peacock herl and the thorax is a concoction of dubbings (dark brown). The hackle is from a PP Starling patch. No wingcase. The hook is an old Mustad 3906.




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