Posts Tagged ‘scud

03
Jan
14

Fly Fishing Scuds: Planet Trout’s End All…………………

Please go to Planet Trout and take a detailed look at all Tim Barker has put together regard fishing scuds in rivers and lakes. The photography, materials inventory, the attention to detail for this piece is exceptional. Any freshwater fly fisher world wide should save this piece and review it often. And, as I have mentioned before if you have a penchant for Hollywood history delve into Tim’s site and you might be well surprised…(hint: Susan Hayward). I fixed the earlier glitch re link.

pinko-uv2-ob-scud-1

Pinko Scud by Tim Barker at Planet Trout

19
Jun
13

Macro Photography: Fly Patterns

Based upon the earlier post re the lack of fly fishing lately, this adage seems appropriate: Those that can fish do & those that can’t tie ever more flies. Some Caddis Pupa, Scuds and Wet Flies (Size 14/16’s)

Fly1SBFly2SBFly4SBFly5SBFly9SBFly6SBFly7SBFly8SB

06
Jul
12

Fly Tying: Busy Movements

This pattern could be a scud or czech style nymph. With the trailing material is falls away from the established profiles. It could be explained as a ‘trailing shuck’ higher in the water column. But, maybe it doesn’t need any excuses. The excess materials have movement and colors to entice and provoke….hopefully. Experimenting with the depth and presentation may prove this ‘mistake’ to be successful. Part of the fun of tying is just experimenting.

19
Apr
11

Fly Tying & Fly Fishing: “Must Have” Scuds

“Must have” patterns both annoy me, and as they should, simplify things. A ‘must have’ pattern can be a trap. Tie it on and go. A ‘must have’ pattern must work all the time, anywhere?

Such is the case with scuds. Most articles are like every one was originally issued a press release from the Fishing Guru 25 years ago and every writer feels obligated to issue the same chopped release/phrases for their region. It smacks of an obligatory inclusion on the last page of a book.

As with any outing, it is better to do some research first re a stream, lake, etc. before going blind. Research on line for info about hatches and when they most often appear (May to June; late afternoons; overcast days best). Also, how to fish them is critical. The presentation of the fly. How would the real ‘insect’ or critter act in the water?

You might be able to gather some meaningful info from your fly shop and a pattern or two to use.

Such is the case with scuds, the ‘must have’ pattern. You will find this must have pattern: drifted and jerked in rapids and riffles with a split shot 6″ above; also you will find it fished deep in stillwaters and the slower, backwaters of rivers beneath a strike indicator with no weight save the fly’s/hook’s weight.

The ‘must have’ scud seems capable of being in all waters and anywhere in those waters according to the varied articles and posts. As with many things for the beginning fly fisher/tier the signs of certainty and clarity are confusing re scuds once you read past ‘must have’.

I won’t propose to be an expert re scuds. I have fished them on tailwater fisheries and done well in quieter, weedy side waters drifting slowly near the bottom. In stillwaters in B.C. and near home, I have fished longer leaders on a floating line and let the fly sink down amongst the weeds and worked the pattern near the bottom, moving it in a slow jigging motion (and yes getting tangled, so a slip strike indicator may be in order…query upper right in search box re slip strike indicator).

I tied the patterns from size 18’s to size 10’s. I like Orange ( a common color for a dead or supposedly egg laden female), tan, and my favorite olive.. Some patterns can be tied with the traditional scud/Czech-Caddsi Pupa configuration as below here:

Both of the above patterns have the back strap of plastic material that is tied in at the bend with ribbing material (wire usually). The body material is either dubbed up the shank or wrapped up the shank (micro chenille and a sparse hackle wrap or two). Then the back strap is pulled over and secured at the eye with the ribbing following to hold the back strap in place. This tying sequence is used in one form or another for Czech, Polish, Caddis, Scud patterns. Large or small.

Another pattern, less sophisticated and still worthy is one I use for Scuds for sizes 10 to 14. I use an Estaz material that is a synthetic (plastic) chenille material. I tie on and wrap up and simply trim the top bristly material away and that is it. It is a great pattern. It can be slightly weighted. I don’t put on a bead, but you could for a Caddis Pupa pattern.

  So, to recap on ‘must have’ Scud’ pattern: research your waters you fish. Do they have scuds? Where are they likely to live in your waters? How would you present the pattern to best put it where they live and maybe move it to suggest life? How would I tie a pattern that looks close in size, color and movement to imitate the real life scud. Research Estaz as a fly tying material and look at the sizes. It is not the same as Sparkle Chenille.

Not to confuse matters more, for the heck of it do a little research on sow bugs as well as they are often linked to scuds (freshwater shrimp) in stream habitat. See if they reside in the same parts of the stream’s holding waters. Good luck and as usual have fun!     


10
Nov
09

Czech or Polish or Caddis Larva (The Attractive Curved Shank Hook)

IMG_1702x

TYING A CZECH NYMPH~SCUD PATTERN~CADDIS LARVA

I like to tie in the plastic over lay at the rear and pull it forward and tie off behind the eye of the hook. I have never adapted to ribbing front to rear for this pattern or like the Elk Hair Caddis, which you sometimes see ribbed front to rear. Aside from that, this is a dandy little pattern in all sizes (a good range is size 6 to size 18, but mostly sizes 10-16). Mix up your colors and try hot colors too. Re Czech Nymphing…I posted quite a bit about it last year….query the search box for more info.

All The Right Curves

ALL THE RIGHT CURVES

bend n hook

28
Dec
08

Nymph’s (Molting & Vulnerable)

 

Molting Scud~V. Markov

Molting Scud~V. Markov

Fly patterns imitating the molting stage can have different shapes but they need to have the following parts, trailing shuck, old (aft) body part, and new (fore) emerging body part. Newly molted insects also usually have a light coloration. My most successful patterns are Hare’s Ear Molt Nymph , Molt Scud and Bead Head Molt Nymph.

http://www.markov.baikal.ru/keep/menu/molt.html

http://www.markov.baikal.ru/keep/8m/mou_s.html




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