Posts Tagged ‘thread body

19
Jan
12

Fly Tying: Simple Thread Bodies

The vast majority of the flies you tie with have material wound onto the shank of the hook to form the abdomen/thorax of the fly. On smaller flies, I have experimenting with a more minimalist style of tying. On some patterns, I have simply used the tying thread for the abdomen with maybe a ribbing of thread as well. The results have been favorable for emergers & dries.

In the above pattern, the Olive Zelon tail/shuck was tied in at the thorax and the olive 14/0 thread was wrapped down the shank toward the bend and then back up to the thorax are. That is the extent of the body (abdomen). There is one turn of dyed olive peacock herl to form a thorax, a tuft of CDC for the swept back wing and a few turns of brown hackle. The thread head is finished off with the same olive tying thread.

Here, I wrapped the olive thread body and went with another color thread to provide a ribbed/segmented appearance. It really doesn't work. The threads appear to have been twisted and when wrapped does not lie flat. The strands of CDC hanging down to the sides would provide life like motion, but again, this was unintentional and created by the hackle wraps, which forced a few strands downward...a good thing possibly. This is why I need to only tie with my new goggles, to better see the mistakes and correct as I go. Does the fly's outcome matter? Probably not, but at some point, does one seek uniformity or tie willy-nilly? For you to decide.

10
Oct
10

Fly Tying: Tail Warp from Ribbing

I set out to tie a size 14 Little Black Stone, or to experiment with a contrasting abdomen (lighter colored wire ribbing against a black 8/0 thread body) as well as a dubbed, spiky thorax over a weighted under layer non-lead wire. I tied a couple and what I found interesting (yet again) was that I did not see that I had butchered the tail in both instances as I commenced wrapping the fine wire ribbing.

Little Black Stone, Size 14 (torqued tails) SwittersB

In the first instance, the first wrap of ribbing was brought from underneath and over the top/away. The wire ribbing divided the tail (hackle fibers) and split them asunder. In the bottom fly, I wrapped away over the top, and you can see the tail fibers were pulled off the top and to the far side of the shank. This, in particular, is a common problem. Usually, it happens as the tail is tied in. I thought I had tied it in on top, using the pinch method. Now, as I am prone to say, both patterns tumbling through the currents probably will fish just fine. But, the ever helpful macro lens reveals much in one’s tying techniques. What I take away from this is to pay much more attention to that first wrap of ribbing. Also, something that is also apparent is the thread body is not wound flat. The thread is no doubt twisted tight and does not lie flat when wrapped. The black thread abdomen was but three layers. You can see the bumps and ridges of the thread body. The wire ribbing often follows these contours and can spread or bunch following the irregular body contours. So, start slow and double check the steps. Also, unwrap and reapply if mistakes are noted. I cannot bring myself to spring for those funky magnifying goggles.

Read comment by Normand Frechette @ flytyingnewandold.blogspot.com/ Very help advise




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