Posts Tagged ‘voar subordina�ly tying knot

10
Oct
09

peacock herl & the shank

fullFeather

PEACOCK HERL & FLY TYING

04
Oct
09

Water Boatman (Fall and then again in the Spring)

Waterboatmen are about to become relevent in the shallows of your pond or stillwater. 

Water Boatman

Water Boatman

“The shallows hold many nymphs that trout will feed on. One insect that is often overlooked by fisherman is the Water Boatman. Since it is an air breathing creature, it has to return to the surface of the water to get oxygen. They are commonly found in water depths of 15’ or less. Their swimming characteristics are quite erratic, going in zig zag directions. They are very fast swimmers and can dive rapidly. Keep this in mind when fishing an imitation. When fishing the water boatman pattern, hits by fish are often very sudden and hard. It is a very fun and successful pattern to use.”

These are an available pattern in the Spring and now the Fall. Some species dive into the water surface to lay eggs and others rise (sipping oxygen at the surface) and dive quickly back to the vegetation.  

waterboatmandorsal

16
Sep
09

Furry Foam As Fly Tying Body Material

Wrapped Furry Foam Body

Wrapped Furry Foam Body

I have never wrapped furry foam around a shank. The FuzzyDragon (T. Muncy) utilizes Furry Foam as a backstrap over the abdomen/thorax. But, here the tyer wound the material for the body. Some nice flies at this site too; click on the pic to enlarge.

07
Sep
09

Dragon Fly Nymphs (Chuck, Duck & Dredge)

It is too easy for stillwater fly fishers to settle upon the ubiquitous Woolly Bugger. The scope of mental exercise becomes what color or color combo. I am not saying I don’t also fall into this accommodating trap. But, I am mindful of what is going on about me and what has worked in the past when I went with those observations.

An aside: I have this affinity for Dragon Flies. They are my mental good luck charm. OK, true story…maybe conincidence…maybe not: I was recently running my finger nails down the blackboard fishing a chironomid pupa down into a weed bed to little avail. All about me dragon flies were hovering before me. Ok, you might say I was providing some form of structure that they were encountering upon emergence. I, however, saw it as a prompting. I know, I know.

So, I re-rigged with a Fuzzy Dragon and back a bit out of the weeds. I lobbed and let the creation sink to the depths. I worked about the edge of the weed beds near the drop off the shoal and yes the hit came. Not a particularly big fish…maybe 13″ BUT, the karma became immediately apparent: the trout had taken my substantial nymph, while trailing about the following: a treble hook attached to 24″ of Stren blue leader attached to a much too big snap/swivel and then an additional 12″ of heavy mono. The line must have been scored or nicked as this little guy would not have had the steam to break the steelhead capable line. I performed the extrication of my Fuzzy Dragon and the fortunately accessible treble hook (Power Bait plunking, I am sure). The fish swam off quite happy and I muttered a thank you to the Dragon Flies. No not the ravages of alcohol or chemicals. Just ridiculously superstitious at times.         

So, I have shown the Fuzzy Dragon before, but worth a re-showing given its role in the remarkeable above interlude. 

Fuzzy Dragon~T. Muncy

Fuzzy Dragon~T. Muncy

 

Fuzzy Dragon by Tony Muncy

Fuzzy Dragon by Tony Muncy

The materials for this fly were selected by its creator, Tony Muncy..then in his early teens. A buggy, impressionistic creation, it has been a great producer. Weighted or unweighted (wire wrapped about shank rather than weighted eyes). If you weight the fly, make certain the rod is strong enough to load that weight or the fly will drop behind you and provide you a rude smack to your back side somewhere! Barb the hook to facilitate hook removal from the fish or your backside. The body can be dubbed or a fuzzy leech yarn or wool yard can be wrapped and brushed out. Even chenille or darker sparkle chenille could be used. The Fuzzy Foam comes in sheets of different colors. It is cut into strips and tied in as an over layer. The important part of the fly is to keep it round, counter weighted in a way so it is not top heavy. It should be cast down to the depths and allowed to settle, then retrieved while visualizing it the predator. Pausing and darting. Hits are hard on this fly. I am glad the trout towing the plunker’s rig about was hungry and capable.   

16
Aug
09

X Caddis Progressions (Opal X Caddis)

Opal X Caddis ~ Dennis Potter

Opal X Caddis ~ Dennis Potter

No doubt the X Caddis is a performer. Just last week, I had some success with it v. the standard EHC. Might have been sizing too as my EHC was a size 14 and the XC was a size 16…not sure. Anyway, this little gem would be an interesting variation. Worth a tie and try to see if Mr. Potter’s advancement is due beyond the appealing visuals…very nice tie and photo… Dennis has some other nice patterns.

14
Aug
09

Insectology For The Beginning FlyFisher (troutnut)

Troutnut is an excellent resource for all fly fishers, especially for the beginner try to sort out basic names and later perhaps progressing to more demanding entomological names. Save this site to your favorites and go to it often.

Green Drake
Green Drake

Apologize for not giving credit to Green Drake pic…lost source info…beautiful photo…perhaps someone knows. Perhaps here:

http://www.xstreamoutdoors.com

08
Aug
09

Blue Winged Olives (BWO’s….prolific, small, Winter’s hope)

The ubiquitous (I love that $10. word) Blue Winged Olive. The BWO (not a trucking company or rail line) is a very common mayfly that is on the small side (size 14-20). The nymph is a swimming type (as opposed to crawler, clinger, burrower which necessitate stouter bodies compared to the more slender swimmer) and some key factors for the nymph pattern are: probably split the difference and tie 16’s with some smaller. Keep the abdomen slim and have a slightly heavier thorax (like the guy that only does benches but not squats…the con look) and have a pronounced dark wingpad (Planet Trout reminded me of this from his observations).

If you query Google Images re BWO’s you will see mostly emergers (little, sparse ties on pupa hooks) and chunky dries (trying to put all the components on a size 18 hook) and not too many nymph patterns. Nymphs are prolific in the drifts of streams and occupy varied waters of the stream from rapids to the adjacent quieter waters. Also, BWO’s hatch several times a year so they are worth consideration as a must have pattern on the mayfly side. Not as flashy as the less frequent hex or the green drakes and PMD’s but BWO’s are early Spring fish food and again in the Fall and Winter (or if you are a hearty Winter fisher, you can simply view this as your primary Winter pattern). Other than midges, you have to agree the BWO is busy enough to be frequently available to the trout. As with other mayflies, the early hatches may be larger (say 14-16) and later smaller (16-20 or smaller). If you tie, it has to be simplistic patterns.

bwo-nym-2  

I think simplistic Pheasant Tail Nymphs, or Krystal Flash bodies or thread bodies with wire ribbing for segmentation will keep the body (abdomen sparse) and then a thorax slightly thicker will complete a simple pattern.  A nice Scott Richmond piece re BWO’s at Westfly.

PTN~SwittersB

PTN~SwittersB

BWO DRY (KISS) From GFF




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